Mexican American Women Analysis

Good Essays
Throughout the whole chapter the main concept of this was the representation the Mexican-American women were trying to portray vs what the media was trying to show. They were being seen as outsiders, as well as being unworthy of state aid and support. Woman were working in harder labor than ever to be accepted. They were ineligible to receive health benefits as well. During this era of war Mexican women were eligible to find employment in canaries, agricultural labor and apparel factories. All the domestic work they were doing they still didn’t get fair treatment. The demand for workers especially Mexican women being recognized grew. Even then if a girl of Mexican ancestry had more experience than “white” girls, the majority of the time they would be passed up because of their Mexican ancestry. Even with that there was still an increase in Mexican workers. Its seems as if much like then, the Mexicans are just being used. Mexicans were being used to the advantage of the companies, only when it benefited America. Americans thought that Mexican immigrants were similar the European counterparts that they would assimilate to their “American ways”. Americans believed in changing the cultural values of Mexican mothers and children, they were considered obstacles for Mexicans to properly assimilate. In some cases, that ideology of not …show more content…
They viewed the Mexican families as flaws, that Mexican families “required intense education in American Values”. From speaking English, personal hygiene, dietary habits, and what they believed to be most important limiting the size of their families. Woman were urged to engage in family planning as well. The expectations that were expected from the kids are similar some around, you’re expected to make good choices, to do good in school and to not be involved in what at that time would be considered the pachuco/a

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Progressive Era: Women & Mexican-Americans In the United States, the 1890s through 1920s time period is known as the Progressive Era. Political reform, along with social activism, was what established this era. In order to move forward as a country, progressives believed we needed to fix or reform our problems. The problems that the nation focused on were major issues, such as safety and environmental issues, child labor, and health issues. Among the most involved were Protestants, who believed…

    • 624 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Mexican American

    • 481 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Status of Mexican Americans, 1848-1900 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: treaty that conclude the war b/w U.s and Mexico. U.S wins and texas is now part of USA 50% of Territory: mexico forced by this treaty to give up 50% of its territory Mexican Nationals Property & Economic Rights Article IX: provide protection of property Article X: grants citizenship Changing Society: Americanization 1. head political system 2. dislocate the landed elite 3. displace…

    • 481 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Mexican Americans

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Mexican American Article Review I feel that it is important in becoming an elementary teacher with special education that we study and teach about Mexican-American history and culture. The first article that I am going to talk is called, "Integrating Mexican-American History and Culture into Social Studies Classroom". The article talks about how Mexican-American are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and also the least educated. The article also gives important information…

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mexican Americans

    • 736 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Mexicans immigrated to the United States back in the 1800's (Stanford, 2006). During 1848 the United States took over a part of Mexico which is now the Southwest (Stanford, 2006). Mexicans living in these areas were Mexican citizens before the acquisition. The United States even went into agreements with Mexico to have Mexicans work in the United States. Mexicans were treated with cruelty, while working the agriculture fields for years. The United States made several agreements with Mexico to have…

    • 736 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Mexican-American

    • 3140 Words
    • 13 Pages

    Lázaro Cardenas & Mexican Populism The Early Years/ The Birth of Populism Lázaro Cárdenas del Río (May 21, 1895 – October 19, 1970) was President of Mexico from 1934 to 1940. From Cárdenas plebian roots, in the lower-middle class he eked out a substantial, moving and largely successful leadership role in a reformative Mexico. Born in the village of Jiquilpan, Michoacán, Cárdenas supported his widowed mother and seven younger siblings from the age of sixteen. His many professional pursuits…

    • 3140 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mexican American Cultural Approaches to Health Mexican American, or Latino, traditional views on health and healing practices are influenced by several other cultures that they have historically had some kind of contact with, such as the Spanish colonizers, indigenous Indian populations, and Western medical practitioners. This varied background accounts for their holistic healing methods and their belief that good health stems from internal balance, a clear conscience, and a strong spiritual relationship…

    • 1240 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    On January 18, 1541, the first death on The Devil’s Highway was recorded. On May 23, 2001, five Mexican men stumble onto The Devil’s Highway, parched and delirious, leaving behind them a winding map of burnt bodies leading towards the Mexican border. However, the Mexican American border is not the only relevant border in their story. The borders that the Wellton 26 face separate not only themselves, but humanity as a whole. History, economics, and the borders between this world and the possibility…

    • 856 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    tensions that an individual may experience on a daily basis. They may be quick to chose a side and distance themselves from the other. Most of the time, people will be regarded as Mexican-American because that is the way society is. Society is quick to put labels and divisons on idividuals. Individuals become just Americans during times of national crisis. When unity is needed by the country, everyone is considered an Americsn…

    • 93 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    When I first thought about what my culture is I automatically thought well I’m Mexican American but after looking up the definition I can say that I am also Military. I say that because after 29 years of marriage to a United States Airmen I have been a part of a society with its own values, customs and way of life. What’s more because of the military I had the opportunity to travel and not only experience other cultures but compare them to mine. Every culture has values, beliefs, customs, and folkways…

    • 146 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mexican American Family

    • 1093 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Most second-generation Asian women were exposed to American values since an early age. Nevertheless, they were detested and oppressed by the American society. They were facing a major identity crisis because they were in between the need to fulfill their parents' expectations and the inclination to be in an American culture (Fan 79). In an Asian family, the tradition is to value elders and other members above one’s own individual self. Especially in patriarchal Asian communities, family…

    • 1093 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays