Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement: The Chicano Movement

Better Essays
The Chicano Movement, also known as El Movimiento, was one of the many movements in the United States that set out to achieve equality for Mexican-Americans. The Chicano Movement began in the 1940 's as a continuation of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement, but built up strength around the 1960’s after Mexican-American youth began to label themselves as "Chicano" to express their culture and proudly distinguish themselves as Mexican-American youth. For many Americans, a Chicano was used as a demeaning term to describe Mexican- Americans, because it became identified with immigrants who are uneducated, unskilled, and poor; however a Chicano is defined as an individual of Mexican descent who lives in The United States. Chicanos wanted …show more content…
Other civil rights movements during this time period that aimed to make a difference, such as the African-American Civil Rights Movement, inspired the Chicano Movement. Many Chicanos fought beside African Americans during this time of activism and the crusade for justice. They incorporated a vast amount of issues in their protests such as improvement in working conditions, wages, and land grants. They also sought to strengthen their education, as well as their voting and political rights.
The United Farm Workers of America, formed in the small town of Delano, California, was one of the first successful organizations that gave strength to The Chicano Movement. Cesar Chavez, a farm worker of the Delano vineyards, formed this organization. The United Farm Workers of America fought for the equality of
…show more content…
The Chicano Student Movement was established to dispute unjust school conditions for Mexican Americans. The Mexican American society had the highest high school dropout rate and lowest college attendance among any other ethnic group. Many schools in The United States did not treat Mexican Americans fairly, by prohibiting them or their teachers to speak the Spanish language and not allowing them to create political or cultural groups. Chicanos were often placed in vocational training classes or classes for the mentally disabled which discouraged them from higher learning. Chicanos wanted smaller class sizes, revision of their textbooks to include Mexican American history, and better educational services and facilities. Their demands weren’t met; therefore students threatened walkouts, which they called blowouts. The largest and most impressive blowout took place in Los Angeles, California in 1968, where approximately 15,000 Chicano students walked out of schools and generated similar actions among students in several black and white schools. Los Angeles public schools are paid based on the number of students in class each day, so by walking out before attendance was taken, the students could single out the schools financially. After several more blowouts at different schools, The Los Angeles Board of Education set up a meeting to discuss their concerns. Chicano

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Shaw, Randy. Beyond the Fields: Cesar Chavez, The UFW, and The Struggle for Justice in the 21st Century. Berkeley: U of California P, 2008. Print.…

    • 2902 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chicanoism Today

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages

    For a more symbolic meaning of the word Chicano/a, to many of us it is the mixture of both American and Mexican culture. It had become a political term for those who wanted to find a more specific word to identify themselves with than Hispanic, a word to classify all who spoke Spanish in America from Latin America. In the 60s the word Chicano/a grew strong with many political Mexican-American's and used it as a source of pride. Today, the older generation of Chicano/as', some but many, see young Chicano/as' as those who live in the past or use the pasts' struggle to reflect on their own lives and go no where to empower their society. For the most part I disagree, I understand and I am grateful for what the older Chicano/as' have done historical for us newer generations of Chicano/as' but I resent that I'm labeled as a "wannabe". In the definition of what it is to be the newer race of Chicano/as' I will have to interpret it from what the past has led us to be now.…

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hispanic Identity

    • 1599 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Chicano Movement changed Mexican Americans’ lives in the United States’ economy. It was a movement that secured these people in the economy with civil rights and economic opportunity. They used tactics such as civil disobedience as an influential way to make it known that “change” was inevitable. Marches, hunger strikes, and litigation were methods that they used.…

    • 1599 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    During the 1960’s the efforts of political activists such as Cesar Chaves, “Corky” Gonzalez, and Dolores Huerta mobilized a broad based civil rights campaign that mirrored the actions of African American civil rights movements occurring at the time. This Mexican American campaign became known as the Chicano Movement, and was the birth of the immigrant group’s political consciousness. This movement used civil disobedience much in the way Martin Luther King Jr. was using it in the South. These tactics were ultimately unsuccessful in achieving their radical goals, but they did succeed in raising self-awareness within their community. They have since begun to use their political power to influence legislation in the United States (MSN Encarta, 2007).…

    • 1528 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Walkout. In the 1960s the education in the Latino community was a poor quality, the dropout rate was over high. The Latino student were not taken serious by the LAUSD board and were not given the same opportunities as the White student were given. Tired of the poor quality of education the Chicano students, lead by the educator Castro, decided to walk out of their classes in 1968 and started a series of protest against the unequal conditions in the LAUSD high schools. This civil movement changed the poor and unequal conditions in the Latino community high schools.…

    • 515 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Living as a Hispanic individual during the 1950’s and 1960’s proved to be difficult. This struggle was widely seen in the rural Hispanics schools. Many students in schools of east LA lived this while many not knowing it.…

    • 416 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Racism on Trial

    • 299 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Racism on Trial Ian F. Haney-López Tyler Turbenson There were many forms of Mexican Americanism and different goals that Mexican Americanism strived to achieve. Two of the most important goals for Mexican Americans born in the wake of the Mexican American Era, were equality and social mobility through education. Albert Einstein stated it best when he said, “The only remedies against race and prejudice are enlightenment and education. This is a slow and painstaking process.” This in fact is what the Mexican-Americans coveted. They strived to break-down the glass ceilings that were socially holding them back from achieving their dreams. The Mexican-American movement embodied the tearing down of social obstacles that made it impossible for them to rise up through corporate America in their professional careers and the hierarchy of life. This is a battle that Mexican-Americans are fight to this day. The quest for justice and yearn for equality never ends. The roots of the Mexican American era began years before the 1930’s however it is apparent in Rosales book Chicano that the 1930’s is when full-fledged Mexican Americanization began. There was a shift towards this identity for many Mexicans in America at the time. The league of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) dominated this era which has a continued impact on today’s current America. LULAC originated in Corpus Christi, Texas and helped Mexican Americans make gains toward equality and better economic welfare. LULAC was an iconic symbol of the Mexican American Era. Works Cited Bibliography: Haney López, Ian F. Racism on Trial: The Chicano Fight for Justice. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2003. “Struggle in the Fields” Video 10/30/2008.…

    • 299 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Becoming Mexican American

    • 1320 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Just like African-Americans segregated into virtual invisibility, Chicanos have become part of all levels of American life. Unlike blacks that were torn from there land and brought here in chains, Mexicans, according to Sanchez, had their own country and culture nearby to cherish and remember in hard times. Unlike the Irish, Africans and others who had come across the ocean and were here to stay, Mexicans could and did go back and forth frequently and in considerable numbers, sometimes to stay, but often to their detriment (Sanchez 220). They were subjected to humiliating and sometimes brutal “repatriation” campaigns. They were literally paid by private or government agencies to leave the country, often to get on Mexico bound trains that were chartered at taxpayers dollars specifically for the purpose of taking them “home” (Sanchez 215). The systems demeaned everyone involved. It was none other than the Mexican government in the personage of the Mexican consul-general to Los Angeles that from 1930 to 1932 helped to direct this effort to literally send…

    • 1320 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although this movie mainly concentrated on the Los Angeles walkouts, it also depicted a well-known Chicano organization called the Brown Berets; the Brown Berets were known for their militant and nationalistic ideology that was often unsuccessful in bring attention to their cause, which was giving better higher education for Chicanos in Mexican-American neighborhoods.…

    • 364 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    First, what is Chicano or Chicana? A Chicano or Chicana is a term used to indicate an identity held by some persons of Mexican descent living in the United States. Often times, it refers to a first or second generation Mexican American living in an urban, Mexican American immigrant community, where there exists the strong ethnic consciousness of being "Mexican American". It is considered a term of ethnic pride, though not all Mexican Americans proud of their heritage necessarily consider themselves Chicano. A woman of this category is usually named by the feminine form Chicana, and, following the usual conventions for Spanish words, the masculine plural form Chicanos is used for groups that include both genders.…

    • 2848 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The 1960s in America brought a host of movements that pushed for equality, power, and change. Each movement helped to shape and effect the other movements happening at the time. Each of these movements emerged due to dissatisfaction with the social constructs in American society. The Black Power Movement, a radical movement of the late 1960s, developed out of the Civil Rights Movement. The Black Power Movement consisted of radicals of the Civil Rights Movement who pushed the boundaries of the movement for black equality and aimed to use more radical approaches to achieve their goals. Asian Americans began to feel the same pressures for change as the blacks at the end of the 1960s and began what was known as the Yellow Power Movement. Another smaller movement emerged out of these two movements called the Chicano Power Movement, which consisted of Mexican Americans who felt that they were losing their culture in the American society. Both the Yellow and Chicano Power Movements emerged because of the Black Power Movement, developing the rhetoric and ideals that the Black Power Movement embodied.…

    • 1249 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    LULAC-contributions: After the Mexican War, thousands of Mexicans became U.S. citizens. Years after years these individuals were subject to discrimination and segregation. LULAC was actually founded before the Chicano Movement in 1929 it is currently the oldest Hispanic rights organization. Schools were segregated during the Chicano movement it was actually legal to segregate students. Many of these schools were given uneducated teachers, no resources, the worst possible way to learn in a school. The schools themselves were in the worst condition possible, funding was distributed to the rich zones never the poor. Another reason for LULAC is the way Mexican Americans were portrayed by society. They were viewed for some reason as lazy people,…

    • 148 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Chicano Riots

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The riots began in Los Angeles, amidst a period of rising tensions between American servicemen stationed in southern California and Los Angeles' Chicano community. Many of the tensions between the Chicano community and the sailors existed because the servicemen walked through a Chicano neighborhood on the way back to their barracks after nights of drinking. The discrimination against the Chicano minority community was compounded by robberies and fights during these drunken interactions. In July 1942, a group of Hispanic youth fought back against police who attempted to break up a street corner gambling game. In October 1942, over 600 Chicano youth were arrested, and dozens charged, in the killing of Jose Diaz in a supposed gang brawl at the…

    • 643 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    paper

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Chicano movement was a movement that occurred approximately around 1960's. The movement was a result of the Mexican-American civil rights movement that occurred in the 1940's which sought out to achieve Mexican-American empowerment . It occurred all over America mostly in Southern California some of the cities involved was Los Angeles ,Fresno,Chicago and El Paso. It merged because Chicanos wanted to challenge people that didn't understand the Mexican culture and heritage. It challenged what people typically thought about Mexicans. The Chicano movements fought for educational, social, and political equality in the United States.…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mexican Dream Act

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages

    (Richard G. & Arnoldo L. pg.4) How badly mistreated farm workers were back in the late 1960’s and so on was abominable. They were forbidden their civil and labor rights considering that they didn’t obtain any legal residency in the United States. As already stated, that’s how the rise of the Chicano Movement came upon. It began by many Mexican Americans who began to develop a whole new attire of political, and social consciousness. They then determined to call themselves chicanos and chicanas, who worked to enhance the political, economic, and social status of their people. (Richard G. & Arnoldo L. pg.…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays