Metropolis And 1984 Analysis

Good Essays
Composers such as, Fritz Lang, Metropolis, and George Orwell, 1984, demonstrates how a government’s repressive values can induce turmoil within societies, to subsequently cause an individual to begin to search for meaning. Lang’s melodrama, silent film reflects on the consequences of rapid industrialisation in the Weimar republic of Germany post WW1, whilst Orwell’s, dystopian satirical novel is inspired by the rise of communism and fascism, as he warns against the advent of totalitarian societies. Both composers, through different inspirations, depict oppressive regimes that cause an individual to question original values and ultimately allows them to search for a sense of meaning and purpose in regaining their individuality.
Both Lang and
…show more content…
Lang uses the manipulation of the workers faith in Maria, to ensure the social hierarchy is maintained. The frontal lighting is utilized to depict Maria’s pure values, which is contrasted with black lighting and shadows to construct Robot Maria as deceptive and conniving. Thus, alluding to the malevolent nature of the elites and their power to manipulate and corrupt society by hijacking faith. The use of Chiaroscuro, exemplified how manipulation is used to stop the search for meaning among the oppressed community. This keeps the nature of a totalitarian society, thus creating a lack of values among the individual. This image of Maria is furthered in the transitioning shot of Freder sick in bed to Maria’s erotic dance. This demonstrates how the falsly advertised immoral values of Maria is able to generate a sense of meaning, as they begin to reflect and question whether within their lives, they are being oppressed through unknown advertised manipulation, which reflects the rise of the 1920’s ‘mass media’ idea within Lang’s time. This juxtaposition in scenes, puts emphasis on the effect oppressive regimes has as they destruct values of generosity and love. Orwell also portrays this as Mr Charrington’s unsympathetic values deceive Winston, due to the manipulation from the parties. Lang’s use of the eye-level shot of the lustful men, invites the audience to understand how manipulation formed by oppressive regimes has caused a lack of relationship values. Lang has used the naïve nature of relationships particularly between Maria and Freder, to stress the negative impacts of manipulation for personal findings; which is reflective of Germany’s sexual restriction, due to the Weimar republics conservative values. These composers, then force the individual to search for their own relationships, rather than aimlessly following government

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    1984 Metropolis Essay

    • 1294 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The quote “The object of power is power” is heavily supported by George Orwell’s 1949 novel ‘1984’ and Fritz Lang’s 1927 film ‘Metropolis’ through their intertextual connections and shared perspectives. Both texts were composed around the context of pre and post World War 2 which is clearly evident through their settings, characterisation, themes and ideas. Through Orwell’s and Fritz’s use of dystopic societies, empowerment of women and detrimental dictatorship rule it is blatant that George Orwell’s quote “The object of power is power” is quite strongly supported by the intertextual connections and shared perspectives of Orwell’s ‘1984’ and Lang’s ‘Metropolis’.…

    • 1294 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Social crisis- Kaiser and traditional authority rejected, democracy seen as way forward but only experimented with rather than fully integrated…

    • 1287 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Introduction begins with broader positioning of thesis, then introduces text followed by thesis statement which suggests contextual links…

    • 1457 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Over a period of time sci-fi authors and composers have presented their texts and films using cautionary tales of our soon to be dystopic society. They use informing techniques to instil the fear of a futuristic dystopic society into the minds of readers and viewers. These authors and composers also bring forth the concepts of conformity, mind-control and censorship. The novel, Fahrenheit 451, written by Ray Bradbury, and the film Gattaca, composed by Andrew Niccol, were not only stimulated to act as cautionary tales but were also influenced by events occurring at the time such as McCarthyism, the post WW2 duration, and the start of eugenics.…

    • 955 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Throughout time Science Fiction writers have produced their work, using the concept of dystopia as a method to express their outlook and opinion on the issues within their existing societies, in which they are writing from. The writer delivers a message to the audience, educating them about the current contextual concerns and the possibility of the dystopias that are developed as a result. This is demonstrated in the novel Fahrenheit 451, written by Ray Bradbury and the film Gattaca, directed by Andrew Niccol. Both of these composers illustrate their fears for the fate of their society through the structural and language features of their texts. Ray Bradbury explores the value of using knowledge and independent thinking rather than blindly following the ‘rules’, without a second thought or question. Andrew Niccol uses the reality of scientific methods, addressing the responder of the direction society is heading in and the fatal result of the future if we were to mess with the balance of nature.…

    • 2278 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    1984 by George Orwell

    • 1295 Words
    • 6 Pages

    1984 by George Orwell is a novel about a man, Winston Smith, living in a dystopian, totalitarian government. The book circulates around the negative ideal of a harsh government strictly controlling the people of a society. 1984 shares some unique similarities as well as differs greatly from actual life that many English lived during the 80’s, even though the book was written nearly 40 years prior and was not looking at a realistic interpretation of what the world would be like. Orwell had a specific idea his book would flow around; Humans cannot be completely controlled by government. But as we near the end of the book, it becomes clearer that in extremely harsh circumstances, one can be fully controlled when faced with fear.…

    • 1295 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The first half of the twentieth century brought about rapid technological advancement in such a short time period. With these emerging technologies brought the increasing reliance of the machine. The dystopic futures of Fritz Lang’s Metropolis and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty Four foreshadows the impeding totalitarianism of a sentient machine. The dehumanising effect created by the machine widens the gap of the social hierarchies, increasing disparities between the working class and the upper class. Both Orwell and Lang concern themselves with the all-consuming fear that a creation of humanity will be the downfall of mankind.…

    • 1115 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Hard Times vs Metropolis

    • 420 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Although introduced almost seventy-three years apart, Charles Dickens’ novel Hard Times, and Fritz Lang’s Metropolis share many common parallels and themes. Through the use of biblical allusions, both Lang and Dickens are able to compare characters in their stories to holy figures such as Freder and Stephen Blackpool being alluded to as Christ-like. Both stories also show the harsh effects of industrialization, and present similar situations of with the school children and factory workers living very monotonous and almost machine-like lives. One last parallel between the novel and movie is a new role for women in society.…

    • 420 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The manipulation of textual forms establishes an avenue of analysis of the composers’ concerns and challenges encountered in their worlds, such as totalitarianism and gender oppression, development of technology and consumerism. The exploration of contextual concerns are evident in Margaret Atwood in her dystopian novel, The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), through the utilisation of the theme of dictatorial power and the experience of individuals, and correspondingly, in Bruce Dawe’s critical poetry, ‘Not So Good Earth (1966)’ and ‘Enter Without So Much as Knocking (1959)’, thereby characterisation. Together, the two composers explore their concerns through the idea of conformity as a form of negative response from individuals influenced by the coexistence of social and personal values.…

    • 1060 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    An author writes with a purpose in mind; in fact, if no purpose exists, no good work of writing exists. In George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, the Inner Party acts exactly as a real life totalitarian government, severely oppressing the people of Oceania to bend them to its will. It takes away any sense of freedom a person holds and erases considered “threats” from existence. Privacy no longer exists either: the Inner Party hears every sound and action a person makes. The rebels and the Inner Party’s control tactics not only allow Orwell to comment on the atrocities a tyrannical authority brings with it, but also to teach his audience to appreciate the value of freedom.…

    • 608 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In After the Bomb, composers not only critique personal and political values but also manipulate textual forms and features in response to their times.…

    • 1133 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1984 Analytical Essay

    • 861 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Orwell shows how the limiting of creativity takes away from our humanity. In the golden country Winston is lying down enjoying the ambience. Orwell illustrates, “But by degrees the flood of music drove all speculations out of his…

    • 861 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Through the study of the two texts, J.D Salinger’s ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ and James Mcteigue’s ‘V for Vendetta’, the central most focused and revolved theme that is explicitly shown is the topic of Non-Conformity. Seen through both sources, it similarly and distinctly illustrates the universal life messages and experiences associated with universal contextual ideas and societal values. Non-Conformity is expressed through the main characters as an action to rebel and go against the rules set by authority and in some cases, venture to the extremes to prove their individuality and independence. This topic is identically shown through ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ and ‘V for Vendetta’. Composers use texts and mould them as a means to convey universal life messages and experiences through the application of societal and opinionated views along with the illustration of their own context. This is clearly seen through the novel; ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ by J.D Salinger (1951) and the film; ‘V for Vendetta’ directed by James McTeigue (2005). Both texts are similarly able to reflect the composer’s experiences and backgrounds which, in this case, through the sub-theme of The Power of Voice, as this theme stems from how one’s context affects society’s perception on the status of a person. Seen through this theme, the Power of Voice is emphasised as having meaning and significance and even in some cases fraudulence in a person’s words based upon their social status, age and background. In addition to this, both James Mcteigue and J.D Salinger show their observations made on society which also reflect society’s goals and values through the sub-theme of Belief and Aspiration for the fact that individuals in society want to reach a specific achievement and to do this they must believe and be desirous of this goal. Texts are brilliant mediums to portray universal life messages and experiences for…

    • 1481 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The nature of the human condition and a questioning of humanity and human beliefs and values on a political, social and personal level have been explored by a number of texts throughout history. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, John Le Carre’s The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Louise Lawrence’s Children of the Dust and Wolfgang Becker’s Good Bye, Lenin! are permeated by a climate of Cold War anxiety, resulting in a heightened level of questioning being reflected in these compositions. Influenced by an underlying sense of fear that characterised the post-bomb period, these composers also question the appropriate ways of thinking that would best result in a society of integrity, amidst a potentially futile struggle for meaning.…

    • 511 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1984 Theme Essay

    • 1053 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Absolute control over society is the central theme in the novel, 1984, by George Orwell. One method this power over society is exercised is use of language to manipulate and control people. The story features a society called Oceania, which is located in the European region. In Oceania, there is a form of totalitarian government called the Party which controls the entire society. The Party controls thoughts by making certain words or phrases illegal. In addition, any anti-party thoughts or motives are also deemed illegal. To control society, thoughts are monitored by telescreens which read reactions and record speech. A force, called the Thought Police, is also engaged to take power over and eliminate society’s individual beliefs. The Thought Police control peoples’ ideas because they know if they have any anti-party motives then they will be killed. This intimidation and control via the use of language is extremely effective in 1984.…

    • 1053 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays