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Mentality In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre

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Mentality In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre
Can the environment an individual being? It often depends on how the person’s mentality change. In Charlotte Bronte’s novel, Jane Eyre, a young woman journeys from place to place and along the way evolves into a greater person. At each location she stays at, she metamorphs into the woman she is at the end of the novel, which is a more confident, self-assured person.
At the beginning of the novel Jane was stuck in an abusive household with her aunt. Her family abused her mentally and physically. Between the red room of pain and her cousin, Jane has a miserable experience, believing the world is a cruel place in which everyone is miserable as she “wished the wind to howl more wildly, the gloom to deepen to darkness, and the confusion to rise
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Reeds House and the love she receives from the residents of Thornfield estates.
Thornfield had the most positive influence on Jane. She became capable of love and compassion through her time with Rochester. The longer Jane stays at Thornfield, the more accepting of herself she becomes. However these feelings of optimism and trust begin to fade when she discovers about Rochester’s insane first wife, Bertha. This causes her to revert back to being cold and distant. However her experience at Thornfield estates helps Jane become brave and strong enough to go back to a place she never wanted to visit again.
While Jane returns to the Moore Household, St. John proposes to her not because he loves her but because he believes she would make a good wife and partner. Jane was tempted to go along with, however changes her mind when she hears Rochester calling out to her.This shows how Jane’s insecurities had almost got the better of her, but the love Rochester and her had for each other proved that she should go after her own

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