Medieval Romance

Good Essays
The Song of Youth On Hallows Eve, in the late 17th century, the village of Elmore ended the embezzlement of young, innocent children. The Tuckerson witches were disillusioned by the fact that they were getting older, thus the reason for the song of youth. When the young children would arrive at their doorstep for the treat, this hypnotizing song drew the young children of the village into the Tuckerson house. The song collected the souls of these innocent children, giving back the youth the witches had lost. However, that night in Elmore, the witches were defeated and turned to stone until a young, foolish, innocent child lit the candle to set the witches free for the cycle to recur. The morning of Hallows Eve, 324 years after the last Tuckerson incident, the children of Elmore went to school as if it were a regular day. At Elmore High a new student, Edward, was told the legend of the Tuckerson witches. He believed it to be a myth, or some silly story to scare him, but he was in for an awakening. That evening he and his new friends decided to go check out the old Tuckerson house. As the legend had stated, a candle was to be waiting to be lit by a young, foolish child. Upon arriving at the Tuckerson house, Edward was dared to go inside the house, find and light the candle, and come back to prove himself right about the legend being false. Although he claimed he did as told, Edward tried his best to find the candle, but couldn’t see anything in the darkness of the night. He arrived home around 10 p.m. that Hallows Eve, spilling out to his parents about his dare. His 11 year old sister, Elizabeth overheard his story and decided she wanted to go see for herself what he was talking about. She called her new friends and invited them to join her on the adventure to the Tuckerson house, but she had to go alone, because they were all too worried it might be real. Elizabeth was a brave, adventurous girl with long blonde hair, and bright green eyes. After her

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Newman, Simon. “Church in the Middle Ages.” Church in the Middle Ages.2008. Web. 05 Mar.2016.…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Medieval Life

    • 526 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The way people were taught and raised in the medieval times depended on their social background. Houses were different from a lord to a laborer. Their material good such as clothing, drink, and food depended on their social stature as well. The duties of the medieval person were different at some points, and varied greatly. However, a dominant force in the medieval times was the church. It played a large part in their days. The lives of the medieval English were different from one class to the next.…

    • 526 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Many historians think that The Middle Ages is a time period of nescience, where few or no improvement took place. The Church was the midpoint of consideration, and in place of rational perspective of the world, beliefs took shape around superstition. On the other hand, following the Middle Ages there was a specific era labeled as the Reneissance where education and developments became revival. It was like a bridge between medieval times and modern history.That is why, the Renaissance was seen as a archetype of the current world and changed people’s way of life, sight of art and scientific…

    • 100 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Medieval Feudalism

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Medieval Europe or the Middle Ages, is a time period during c.500 AD to c. 1500 AD. There are many societal aspects that can be observed during this time period that served Medieval Europe's function and growth, two of which are crime and punishment and towns, cities and commerce. These two societal aspects contributed to the functioning of the feudal system, the power of rulers and prosperity of nations. Feudalism was introduced to England and Europe when William the Conqueror successfully invaded England in 1066 and enforced the idea that In order to be successful one must be loyal to the King. To many a historian this is where the strength of Europe, particularly England grew. Punishment and commerce are two important societal aspects that…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    From the 6th to 15th centuries in Europe, there was a time widely regarded as The Middle Ages. This period of time also goes by many other names. Some of these are The Age of Faith, The Dark Ages, The Age of Feudalism, and The Golden Age. The chaos and disorder during this time, sparked by the fall of the Roman Empire, called for a new type of localized government, feudalism. The church acted as the main way for one to learn and make advancements in science and art. This is what leads one to believe the proper label for the Middle Ages is The Age of Faith.…

    • 766 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Middle Ages covered a span of approx. 1000 years and have been described as a long period of cultural decline and stagnation. The Middle Ages were marked by the diversification and growth of economy and society and by the subsequent social tension and political and religious conflict. The early era of the middle ages is known as the Dark Ages and covered a time period form 410 A.D. through 1066 A.D. The name the Dark Ages referred to the period of time in Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire The art of the dark ages were mainly created for the eastern Orthodox Church and given the name Byzantine Art. Byzantine Art depicts the differences in the development of the Catholic religion in the west and the Byzantine Empire. Byzantine art was restricted to religious art created by monasteries, these works were one dimensional with no shadows, and muted somber tones. There were no portrait paintings and figures that were painted were done only as front facing with long, somber faces with no attempt at realism. The mental condition of the Middle Ages was one of ignorant prostration before the idols of the Church and the mind of man was ignorant of its own treasures and its own capacities. (Guisepi, n.d.). There were few schools established and monasteries were…

    • 1107 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Is The King Arthur Legend a romance? The answer to this question is a simple ‘yes’. ‘Why?’ some may ask. That answer is simple as well. The King Arthur Legend is a romance because it is full of noble heroes, daring deeds, gallant quests, extraordinary happenings, and far off lands. So, is this legend a romance?…

    • 708 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The characters in The Song of Roland at first glance often seem strange to modern eyes. They are obsessed with honor, prone to sudden outbursts of emotion and seem to enjoy splitting their enemies from nasal to navel just a bit too much. Upon closer reading, however, patterns begin to emerge from their actions. Their obsession with honor comes from a fierce devotion to familial and feudal prestige; their emotional outpourings are the expressions of a “noble knight”1, and their ferocity in battle is both necessary and a way to win glory for both themselves and their lord.…

    • 1063 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Medieval Castles

    • 2092 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Although it is thought that medieval times were barbaric they too enjoyed many comforts we still do today. There is much more to the castle then its ' size or the stone arches inside which are still used in many homes today. Castles today are still flocked to by millions of people every year. Sometimes you even see copies of castles right here in the U.S.A but they are not quite the same. Although they were originally built to protect the King, Castles became more and more popular among other nobles as well. Each family castle had their own special design and touch but most castles of medieval times had a lot of the same basic elements in their interior.…

    • 2092 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Though it is often viewed both as the archetypal Anglo-Saxon literary work and as a cornerstone of modern literature, Beowulf has a peculiar history that complicates both its historical and its canonical position in English literature. By the time the story of Beowulf was composed by an unknown Anglo-Saxon poet around 700 a.d., much of its material had been in circulation in oral narrative for many years. The Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian peoples had invaded the island of Britain and settled there several hundred years earlier, bringing with them several closely related Germanic languages that would evolve into Old English. Elements of the Beowulf story—including its setting and characters—date back to the period before the migration. The action of the poem takes place around 500 a.d. Many of the characters in the poem—the Swedish and Danish royal family members, for example—correspond to actual historical figures. Originally pagan warriors, the Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian invaders experienced a large-scale conversion to Christianity at the end of the sixth century. Though still an old pagan story, Beowulf thus came to be told by a Christian poet. The Beowulf poet is often at pains to attribute Christian thoughts and motives to his characters, who frequently behave in distinctly un-Christian ways. The Beowulf that we read today is therefore probably quite unlike the Beowulf with which the first Anglo-Saxon audiences were familiar. The element of religious tension is quite common in Christian Anglo-Saxon writings (The Dream of the Rood, for example), but the combination of a pagan story with a Christian narrator is fairly unusual. The plot of the poem concerns Scandinavian culture, but much of the poem’s narrative intervention reveals that the poet’s culture was somewhat different from that of his ancestors, and that of his characters as well.…

    • 10151 Words
    • 41 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    While dancing in the forest, a group of girls go dancing with a slave. The local minister catches the girls. As one of the girls fall into a coma like state, rumors begin to circulate in town. Doubt, questioning, and rumors of witchcraft fill the air in the small Salem town. Throughout the story, the author uses hysteria to evoke chaos, doubt of one’s neighbor to create fear in the townspeople.…

    • 308 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Medieval Romance

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Medieval Romance played a big role in idealizing Chivalry. It mostly focuses on the hero and his noble deeds. The story,'' Federigo’s Falcon,'' was written in the 1350’s in Florence, Italy by Giovanni Boccaccio. ''Le Morte D'Arthur'' was written in the1450's in England by Sir Thomas Malory. Both Ferdrigo and Sir Lancelot have strong chivalric qualities and are seen as heroes in both but today chivalry is no longer existent due to the changes of our lifestyle.…

    • 1007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    France. As the Carolingian Empire declined and the rulers weakened, a split occurred in the region of France between two factions. One faction supported Charles the Simple; the other supported the Count of Paris. This second faction eventually won out and a new family of Capetian kings ruled the kingdom of France. The Capetian kings ruled France for over three hundred years from 987[->5] to 1328[->6].…

    • 4597 Words
    • 19 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    As the sun set on the last bonfire of the year, the kids all gathered around, waiting for Billy Black’s famous campfire stories. The weekend prior Halloween meant his tales would make even the bravest would shiver in fright as they huddled in a tight group, listening attentively as his voice echoed through the night air with only the crackling fire to interrupt him.…

    • 1383 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Medieval Knights

    • 993 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Knights. These ironclad men of honor were the defining feature of the Middle Ages, becoming heroes and villains in post-medieval literature alike. Stories like The Once and Future King, a King Arthur story, are widely popular today for one reason: not because they are great sources of fantasy, but because they contain knights. Sir Lancelot, Sir Grummore, and Sir Gawaine are all great examples of heroic knights. However, the lives of knights are mostly unknown to the people of today. In the following 3 paragraphs, this report uncovers the truth behind becoming a knight, as well as the complex knighting ceremony, and later the daily life of these mounted warriors.…

    • 993 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics