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To what extent was slave labour used in areas other than sugar production during the 17th and 18th centuries?
This study is mainly how slave labour was used in other areas than sugar production during the 17th and 18th centuries. These areas were mainly focused on coffee, cocoa, logwood, and mahogany. Productions in these areas were successful and the level of production to make and exchange these products along with its competitors from other countries was a hard task to complete along with the labour put into it.
The reason for choosing this topic is because of the nature of it. It defines the quality of the production of various labors used other than in sugar production. For example mahogany is used to make furniture and the labour force is quite liable to the point where they had to spend a good time away from their families. On the other hand in sugar production the laborers are managed by time when doing their work for the day and then sent back to their quarters. Unlike sugar cane the production of mahogany comes with risks and is time consuming but is beneficial in the end. Other than that it states the importance of the different types of labor used in order to gain more money in production instead of just doing one crop. In contrast the production of coffee compared to the production of sugar cane varies. In this sense it shows how between 1511 and 1886 over 1 million slaves were imported from Africa to Cuba in order to work their crops. Although the production and selling of sugar in the country began the slave holding, the presence of coffee played an equally important role in establishing slavery in Cuba. When coffee reached Cuba, farmers welcomed it; coffee required less land to grow and its machinery needs were minimal. The slaveholding during this time was managed by a prison-like atmosphere creating unrest and inevitable rebellions against the wealthy that enslaved them. Coffee production in Cuba was short lived due to competition with

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