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Martin Luther King's Letter To Birmingham Jail

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Martin Luther King's Letter To Birmingham Jail
2. In paragraph one, King states that he wants to address his audience’s statement “in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms.” He starts off like this because King wants everything to be peaceful and drama-free. In paragraph two, King said, “Several months ago the affiliate here in Birmingham asked us to be on call to engage in a nonviolent direct-action program if such were deemed necessary.” This piece of evidence is explaining that he was there to take part in something nonviolent. This connects back to what he said in paragraph one because since this is a nonviolent action, he wishes for everything to be civil so everything can worked out as planned. This sets the tone as very calm and straight to the point because King means …show more content…
In paragraph three, King compares himself the the Apostle Paul. King comparing himself to the Apostle Paul supports his reason for going to Birmingham because just like Paul did, King did which was preach the gospel. In paragraph three of the Letter to Birmingham Jail it says, “Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco-Roman world, so am I. compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to Macedonian call for aid.” So, this is saying how King is there because he wants to preach how freedom belongs to everybody not just from Atlanta which was where he was born and raised, but all over the United States just like how Paul preached the gospel. This impacts the tone of the text because it shows just how much of a good person King is. He is taking his own time to tell people what’s right and what is wrong and how he wants to help people gain freedom. From this, I can infer that King had good intentions in going from town to town helping the people. I can also infer that his audience was wondering why he was there and if he was doing this to help them or not because King had to keep explaining why he was …show more content…
I was born January 15, 1929 so I am currently 34 years old and even though I was African-American I was in the middle class. I always had a high value for education and attended Boston University and Morehouse College. Not only do I value education but I also equality for all. I Believe that we should be equal, have equal rights, and everyone should be heard. I consider myself a good genuine man that tries to help out everybody as much as he can. From a young age I was very involved in my church and had a lot of experience in preaching and that sort of matter which is why I consider myself such a good speaker and or writer. when I write or even speak I like you being in a very calm environment. However, when I wrote the letter from Birmingham Jail I wasn't necessarily in a calm setting I was in jail for expressing what I believe in. I believe I shouldn't have been put in jail which is why I decided to write this to try to help the people of Birmingham see what I see and that is that we’re all equal. Overall, that was my purpose to get people to stop thinking that they're better than another person and that those people that are put down are at the same level as the people that brought them down. I was hoping to show this through action but since I was put into this jail my writing will have to do that. As I was saying what probably influenced me the most was people feeling like they don't belong in which they should feel like they do

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