Martin Luther King’s Letter From Birmingham Jail Essay Analysis

Topics: Racism, African American, Martin Luther King, Jr. Pages: 5 (1186 words) Published: October 6, 2014
Augustine Uguw
Professor Ileana Loubser
ENGL 1301
10/02/2014
Martin Luther King’s Letter From Birmingham Jail Essay Analysis King expresses his credibility on the subject matter of racial discrimination and injustice which the African Americans are passing through during the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama. By expressing his trustworthiness to the clergymen and the people of Alabama in order to get their attention, King state that "I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization operating in every southern state, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. We have some eighty-five affiliated organizations across the South, and one of them is the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights” (King 1). King established his trustworthiness and credibility to a greater extent by mentioning that to the clergymen. He was not trying to obstruct the clergymen, but fairly appealing to them to invite and comfort the African Americans to Birmingham. He shows the clergymen and the people of Alabama that he is not only an essential character but also has strong morals and ethics. King expressed and demonstrates to the clergymen and the people of Alabama that he is a person that can be trusted and someone who stick to his word. As King shows his credibility and trustworthiness to the clergymen and the people of Alabama city by appealing to them using ethos, Instead of starting his letter with the impersonal statement "Dear Sir”; he uses a warm greeting “My Dear Fellow Clergymen” (King 1), he warmly greet the clergymen but the greeting is more than that; he greeting was of good intension and love for his fellow clergymen. By addressing the clergymen and the people of Alabama City as his fellow clergymen, he is reminded them that they are all equals. King does not want to terrify or upset the clergymen and his audience which might be disposed to listen to arguments which they clergymen have not previously considered. However, this is not to imply that King did not really want white allies or that this is only a rhetorical approach, but his moderation over a topic that undoubtedly moved him is undeniable Martin Luther King, employ rhetorical appeals to convince the Clergymen and Birmingham City about the brutal treatment in which the African Americans were facing during the Civil Rights Movement were unjust During the Civil Rights Movement, King, employ the use of logos to appeal to the Clergymen and the city of Alabama. Within this period of Civil Rights Movement in 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama, the strain of racial segregation that was imposed on the African Americans was reaching to the point where the African Americans were treated badly in the public. After being arrested for his part in the Birmingham Campaign, King wrote rhetorical appeal letter in response to “A Call for Unity”, which was written by eight white clergymen from Alabama. In order for King to get the heart of the clergymen and his audience, he uses logos to elucidate to the clergymen by comparing racial injustice to a boil: King state, “Like a boil that can never be cured so long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its ugliness to the natural medicines of air and light, injustice must be exposed, with all the tension its exposure creates, to the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured” (King 4). King, uses the trope “like a boil” to explain to the clergymen that the situation which the African Americans are into is unjust. He also emphasize to them how the boil “can never be cured as long as it is covered up”, by explaining to the clergymen that racial injustice that has been uphold on the African Americans need to me made open to everyone, in other words, the boil cannot be cure unless its opened. King explains to the clergymen and the city of Alabama by appealing to them to put into consideration the hard time and unlawful treatments in which the African...
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