Marilyn Monroe

Topics: Marilyn Monroe, 20th Century Fox, Suicide Pages: 5 (1481 words) Published: October 29, 2013
Olivia
Coach Black
Pre AP English1/A2
18 February 2013
Marilyn Monroe, World Beauty Icon
Thesis: Marilyn Monroe’s internal pain and suffering did not stop after a difficult childhood of being abandoned by her parents, but followed her throughout the rest of her life through multiple failed marriages, stereotyping by critics, and severe depression, which ultimately lead to her famous suicide. I.Birth and Early Childhood

A. Birth and real name
B. Parents
C. Orphanages and foster homes
D. Rejection and sadness
II.Young Adulthood
A. High school dropout
B. Marriage to a sea merchant
C. Model
D. Appearance and name change
III.Glamorous Life
A. Marriage to a baseball star
B. Actress
C. Roles
D. Movies
E. Marriage to movie maker
IV.Depression
A. Depression and drug abuse
B. Failure to be taken seriously as an actress
C. Rumors
V.Death
A. Mode of death
B. Suspected causes
VI.Legacy
A. International fame
B. Influence on the world

Olivia
Coach Black
Pre AP English1/A2
20 February 2013
Marilyn Monroe, World Beauty Icon
Marilyn Monroe. Sex icon. Beauty queen. Movie star. Legend. One of the most famous blonde women in the entire world. Everyone loved her because her charm and personality put her in a class all her own. But no matter how much she smiled her perfect smile for the camera or acted out her character flawlessly, her life was not as perfect as it seemed, especially on the inside. She had sorrow and struggles surrounding her all her life. Marilyn Monroe’s internal pain and suffering did not stop after a difficult childhood of being abandoned by her parents, but followed her throughout the rest of her life through multiple failed marriages, stereotyping by critics, and severe depression, which ultimately led to her famous suicide.

America’s sweetheart was born June 1, 1926, in Los Angeles with the name of Norma Jeane Mortenson. Her childhood was not a happy one though, and she did not grow up in a picture perfect family. Her mother was determined clinically insane and never even knew her father, who abandoned her mother before she was even born (Millidge 146). Marilyn was put through many different orphanages and foster homes until she became 16. Going through so much trouble at such an early age saddened her a lot and would traumatize her later on in life. But despite the hard times she went through, she kept her dream of becoming a beautiful famous actress one day, and she never lost sight of that goal no matter how hopeless it seemed at the time (Millidge 146).

Marilyn decided to take matters into her own hands when she turned sixteen though and dropped out of high school in 11th grade to marry a merchant Marine by the name of Jimmie Dougherty. In 1944 Jimmy left to go to a boot camp, and Marilyn was spotted by a photographer and was offered a job as a model. This is what started her off to the path of fame (Millidge 146).

After her budding career as a model, Marilyn’s increasing rise in stardom then began. Not long afterwards, she married famous baseball player, Joe DiMaggio. That marriage failed shortly afterwards with rumors spreading like wildfire that DiMaggio was abusive toward Marilyn because of bruises on her body seen at a photo shoot (Hall 487). That earned her a bit of attention, but what really got everyone to look at her was in 1946 when she signed her first contract with 20th Century Fox (Millidge 147) and decided to try to improve her image by dyeing her hair that patented peroxide blonde (Rudnick) and changing her name to the name all have come to know and love, Marilyn Monroe (Cady 248).

Marilyn soon found out that Hollywood wasn’t exactly as picture perfect as she imagined it as a child. She soon explained Hollywood through a famous quote of hers saying that, “Hollywood’s a place where they’ll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss, and fifty cents for your soul. I know, because I turned down the first offer often...

Cited: Cady, Barbara. “Marilyn Monroe.” Icons of the 20th Century: 200 Men and Women Who Have
Made a Difference. Ed. Raymond McGrath. Woodstock: The Overlooks Press, Peter Mayer
Publishers Inc. 1998. 248. Print.
Ebert, John David. Dead Celebrities, Living Icons: Tragedy and Fame in the Age of the
Multimedia Superstar. Santa Barbra. ABC-CLIO. LLC. 2010. Print.
Hall, Ann C. “Marilyn Monroe.” American Idols. Ed. Dennis R. Hall and Susan Grove Hall.
Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group Inc., 2006. 487-492. Print.
Millidge, Judith and Jessica Hodge. Icons. Sywell. Igloo Books Ltd. 2010. Print.
Rudnick, Paul. “Marilyn Monroe. (Cover Story)” Time. 153.23 (1999): 128. Academic Search
Premier Web. 13 Feb. 2013.
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