Maconochie's Gentlemen: Chapter 3 and 4 Review

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Running Head: Chapter 3 & 4. Review “Maconochie’s Gentlemen”

Chapter 3 & 4. Review “Maconochie’s Gentlemen”
Neil D. J. Kerr
CJ 104: Section 001
April 15, 2010
Boise State University

Introduction In this paper, I will summarize part 3 “Why Do Prison Conditions Matter?” and part 4 “Contemporary Lessons from Maconochie’s Experiment” of Maconochie’s Gentlemen, written by Norval Morris (Morris, 2002). I will then provide a critical analysis of Maconochie and the Norfolk Island Prison reform story to current correctional practices.
Summary
In part 3, Morris (2002, p.171) discusses why prison conditions matter and why penal reformers, including himself, have devoted their lives and travelled thousands of miles to other countries in search of answers to questions that would improve prison correction from what is corrupt or defective. Morris (2002, p.172) suggests human rights are relative to all human beings whether free or imprisoned and he considers prisons as a smaller community within the world. Thus, the infliction of unnecessary torture and pain cannot be justified and therefore must be prevented and eradicated. Morris (2002, p.174) sighted notable philosophers, politicians and other prominent persons who believed the treatment of a prisoner is an instrumental indictor of a civilized society. Without difference, Morris (2002, p176) puts forward his ideas of improved educational, vocational training programs and psychological evaluation followed by treatment with the goal of reducing a relapse into criminal behavior. In part 4, Morris (2002, p.177) makes reference and connection to the intellectual insight that Maconochie’s work on Norfolk Island and at Birmingham prison has had on the United States correctional institutions. Maconochie (Morris, 2002) advocated indeterminate sentences as opposed to fixed sentences; he suggested prisoners should be the keepers of the keys to their own cells. In the 1830s, this



References: Austin, J. & Irwin, J. (2001). It’s About Time: America’s Imprisonment Binge. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. Morris, N. (2004). Maconochie’s Gentlemen: The story of Norfolk Island and the roots of modern prison reform. New York: Oxford University Press. Simon, J. (1993). Poor Discipline: Parole and the Social Control of the Underclass, 1890-1990. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Welch, M. (2004). Corrections: A critical approach. New York: McGraw-Hill.

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