Macbeth - the Banquet - Act 3 Scene 4

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Topics: Macbeth
The Banquet scene in Macbeth is one of the most well remembered scenes because of its dramatic impact to the audience. The scene shows an obvious failure of Macbeth's mental powers which is the expected consequence of his deadly actions.
At the Palace, a Banquet is prepared for the celebration of the new King and Queen; malevolent Macbeth and his wicked wife. Ross, Lennox, other lords and attendants are present.
Macbeth feels very confident, comfortable and in no doubt that anything will come across his way of being King for the rest of his life. He behaves as the perfect host in his new role as king: “Ourself will mingle with society and play the humble host”. Macbeth’s use of the Royal plural emphasises his importance now and that he has succeeded Duncan, also the use of the word ‘host’ suggests that Macbeth is enjoying the social aspect of the sore.
As soon as everyone sits down around the table heaped with feast, one of the treacherous murderers knocks a side door. When Macbeth sees the murderer, he says, “There’s blood upon thy face”. It illustrates to Macbeth that the murderer has eradicated Banquo and Fleance. Macbeth is then happy to hear about Banquo’s death, when the Murderer says, “`tis Banquo’s then.
When the Murderer divulges to Macbeth, “Fleance is scaped”. Macbeth’s nightmares come back and describes this when he says, “Then comes my fit again” emphasising how he will not be able to sleep again. When Macbeth dreams, “I had else been perfect; whole as the marble, founded as the rock, as broad and general as the casing air: But now I am cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in to saucy doubts and fears”, Shows how he is scared by comparing himself to the past when he had no single nightmare to now when he is tangled up with doubts and fears and knows he won’t get away with the murder of Banquo because of Fleance’s escape!
On line 38, the ghost of Banquo

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