Macbeth - Lady Macbeth

Topics: Macbeth, Thou, Word / Pages: 8 (1928 words) / Published: Oct 9th, 1999
Macbeth – Scene Analysis

“Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised; yet do I fear thy nature, It is too full o’th’milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst strongly win. Thou’dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, ‘Thus who must do’ if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do. Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have crowned thee withal.” -Lady Macbeth, Act 1 Sc5, Lines 13 – 28

Amongst the most essential of characters in the play “Macbeth” by William Shakespeare is Lady Macbeth. Upon the introduction of Act 1 Scene 5, Lady Macbeth is brought into the plot of the play. In this soliloquy, Lady Macbeth comments on her thoughts after having read a letter from her husband, Macbeth, informing her about the witches’ prophecies on the possibility of Kingship. A variety of outstanding topics are explored, including the revelation of the true traits of characters such as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Her first thoughts are based on the reaction of the realism of Macbeth being Thane of Glamis, and possibly Cawdor as the witches predicted. This is expressed through the words “What thou art promised”. The idea of having soliloquy interacting with the witches’ predictions creates a sense of spirituality. This being Lady Macbeth’s first appearance in the play is effective as it allows the reader to associate this sense of spirituality and evil with her character, that has yet to have any substance to allow the reader to

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