top-rated free essay

Lovely 12

By perangela Apr 17, 2014 11836 Words
Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do. Book Review: The Innocent Man

Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do. Book Review: The Innocent Man

Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do. Book Review: The Innocent Man

Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do. Book Review: The Innocent Man

Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Book Review: The Innocent Man
Posted on January 3, 2008 | 6 Comments
John Grisham’s first nonfiction book, The Innocent Man, is brilliant. His ability to write fast-moving plots makes it a thrilling read. Beyond that, Grisham’s book makes a strong case against the death penalty–as it is applied in the United States. The book not only gives you a few hours of suspense and intrigue, but it also forces you to reconsider your opinions on crime and punishment under our current justice system. In fairness I will point out that Bill Peterson, the District Attorney in the book, challenges its accuracy and its portrayal of his role in the case.

The Innocent Man tells the story of Ron Williamson, who was convicted of a rape and murder that he did not commit. The title gives that part away. What makes the book such a gripping read is that Grisham lays out the background and the step-by-step details of how such a thing could happen. It seems almost unbelievable that such a travesty could occur, but when you read about the confluence of several forces–bad police work, overzealous and dishonest prosecution, weak defense lawyering, and ineffective trial management by the judge–you get a clear picture of how people end up getting wrongly convicted. (Again, I will write in fairness that DA Peterson defends his work on the original case and claims that it was he who helped to correct the wrong that was done.)

After reading the book, I have changed my mind about the death penalty. I still think it is a logical and ethical punishment to mete out to a murderer, but I think that our system is too prone to misapply it and other punishments. For me to support it now, some changes would have to occur:

1. We must remove the incentive that police have to arrest and charge somebody with a crime at all costs. There is too much pressure on the police to catch somebody, anybody, when a violent crime has been committed. As a society we need to change our demand for an arrest and insist that nobody be arrested without very solid evidence. In addition, there must be consequences for police investigators who wrongly charge somebody, either through neglect or through purposely planting or exaggerating evidence.

2. We must also remove the incentive that district attorneys have to prosecute and get a conviction against somebody. As it is now, DA’s build their reputations and their careers upon the number of convictions they rack up. We as a society should insist that they care more about getting the right person–not just any person. There should also be harsh consequences for prosecuters who put innocent people behind bars–or get them nearly executed.

3. Somehow we have to make it possible for poor defendants to get good representation from their appointed attorneys. It is simply unjust that a wealthy person, such as O. J. Simpson, can hire a team of super lawyers to defend him, while a poor person, like Ron Williamson, is stuck with an apparently reluctant and ineffective lawyer. I’m not sure how we could make the system more equitable, but we should stop executing people until we do.

Cite This Document

Related Documents

  • The Lovely Bones

    ...The Lovely Bones, written by Alice Sebold, is originally published in hardcover by Little, Brown and Company in USA in 2002. Its paperback version is published by Back Bay Books in New York, USA in 2004. It is a murder fiction that talks about life. The story was set in Norristown, Pennsylvania, from 1973 to 1981. It was full with sadness, b...

    Read More
  • Lovely Bones

    ...The story begins in Norristown, Pennsylvania in 1973. 14-year-old Susie Salmon takes her usual shortcut home from her school through a cornfield. George Harvey, a 36-year-old neighbor who lives alone and builds doll houses for a living, persuades her to have a look at an underground den he has recently dug in the field. Once she enters, he rapes...

    Read More
  • The Lovely Bones

    ...The Lovely Bones 1. The title of the book, “The Lovely Bones”, has a lot of strong and deep meaning behind it. In the story, a girl named Susie Salmon is raped and killed by a creepy neighbor who had been watching her for some time. The story then goes on to explain how her family coped with the hardships of losing her, which wasn’t eas...

    Read More
  • The Lovely Bones

    ...What literary techniques has Alice Sebold used to lead readers to sympathise with the characters In The Lovely Bones? ‘The Lovely Bones’ was written by renowned author Alice Sebold, who utilized various literary techniques to enhance our understanding and enjoyment of the novel. Rather than just writing about the rape and murder of fourte...

    Read More
  • lovely bones

    ... ENC 1102-19M 26 March 2013 The Lovely Bones: An Annotated Bibliography Kaighobadi, Farnaz, Todd K. Shackelford, and Aaron T. Goetz. "From Mate Retention to Murder: Evolutionary Psychological Perspectives on Men’s Partner-directed Violence." Review of General Psychology 13.4 (2009): 327-34. Academic Search Complete. Web. 31 Mar. 2013. ...

    Read More
  • Essay the Lovely Bones

    ...2009 NCEA External Examination Level 2 - 2.3 Extended Text Excellence answer Topic 2: Readers will often think about characters long after a text has been finished. Analyse how the writer made a character or characters memorable for you in a text you have studied. In The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold the main character Susie Salmon is made ...

    Read More
  • The Lovely Bones Lesson Plan

    ...Book form report The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold __________________________________________________ Introduction. ____________________________________________________________ _______ The Lovely Bones is a story written from a fourteen-year-old girls’ point of view about the ...

    Read More
  • The Unimportance of Closure in The Lovely Bones

    ...The Unimportance of Closure in The Lovely Bones Thesis: The Lovely Bones is well-known for its unique narrative perspective and the discussion of love and hatred. But this paper intends to argue that the unimportance of closure is the most significant theme of the work. Characters failed to achieve a closure ultimately, so they chose to cont...

    Read More

Discover the Best Free Essays on StudyMode

Conquer writer's block once and for all.

High Quality Essays

Our library contains thousands of carefully selected free research papers and essays.

Popular Topics

No matter the topic you're researching, chances are we have it covered.