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Louis P. Pojman's Analysis

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Louis P. Pojman's Analysis
Aristotle was Plato’s prize pupil who discussed the types of moments where moral correctness may be applied to certain events, nature of virtues involved in the sound morality of humans as well as the ways to achieve happiness in one’s life. The overall question that Aristotle tends to ask himself and try to answer is the question that pertains to human character and personality, what do we as humans need to do, to be considered as a good person. Aristotle explained that every activity has a final cause and purpose at which it aims to achieve and he argued that since there is not an infinite amount of goods, there has to be one type of good that is the highest and most important which humans strive towards. He continues to describe this ultimate good and decided that it could be called happiness, however the only puzzling question left is, what is happiness? Due to its existence in so many forms it is tough to describe happiness as one true thing …show more content…
Aristotle’s general ideology is that all things in the universe have a certain characteristic function that they can properly use to perform different types of tasks. Therefore the good that exists at all times must involve the interaction of human life and take it into consideration as a whole which must pertain to the soul and express genuine virtue. In Louis P. Pojman’s Philosophy the Quest for Truth, “The masses and cultured classes agree in calling it happiness and conceive that to live well or to do well is the same thing as to be happy,” meaning that politics and ethics seem to agree on living well and ethically is similar to happiness however they do not agree on what happiness actually is (522). In turn this means that humans should

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