Liver Stiffness Essay

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Alcohol related liver diseases are a wide range area which refers to a general term named as alcoholic liver diseases. Millions of individuals around the world get affected with liver diseases due to high alcohol consumption. Several risk factors have been analysed that affects the risk of development and evolution of liver disease. The primitiveness and estimation of alcohol related alcoholic liver diseases depends on the pattern and term of alcohol consumption, presence of liver inflammation, diet, nutritional status and genetic composition. Sex, ethnicity, obesity, iron overload and infection can also be possible factors that affects in the development of liver diseases.
Mechanisms that derive progression of alcoholic liver disease have
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Nonetheless the diagnosis of fatty change, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma can be done by ultra sound scan, computed tomography scan (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed by laboratory findings. The basic imaging technique for liver examination is sonography. Liver stiffness is a measurement of hepatic fibrosis which can be accessed via transient elastography (FibroScan). Previous studies have shown that patients with alcoholic cirrhosis had a greater value of liver stiffness than patients suffered viral …show more content…
Clinical and biochemical markers are very poor indicators in absent decompensated diseases such as liver diseases and liver biopsy can be useful in identifying the severity and the stage of the disease. The severity and the stage of alcoholic liver disease may indicate different histological features such as steatosis (fatty change), lobular inflammation, Mallory bodies, periportal fibrosis, bile duct proliferation, nuclear vacuolation and fibrosis / cirrhosis. Aggregated cytokeratin intermediate filaments and other proteins represent Mallory bodies which are granulocytic cells distributed

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