Liquid Sublimation

Topics: Acetic acid, Solubility, Solvent / Pages: 15 (3624 words) / Published: Aug 19th, 2013
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Liquid–liquid extraction
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Liquid–liquid extraction also known as solvent extraction and partitioning, is a method to separate compounds based on their relative solubilities in two different immiscible liquids, usually water and an organic solvent. It is an extraction of a substance from one liquid into another liquid phase. Liquid–liquid extraction is a basic technique in chemical laboratories, where it is performed using a separatory funnel. This type of process is commonly performed after a chemical reaction as part of the work-up.
The term partitioning is commonly used to refer to the underlying chemical and physical processes involved in liquid–liquid extraction but may be fully synonymous. The term solvent extractioncan also refer to the separation of a substance from a mixture by preferentially dissolving that substance in a suitable solvent. In that case, a soluble compound is separated from an insoluble compound or a complex matrix.
Solvent extraction is used in nuclear reprocessing, ore processing, the production of fine organic compounds, the processing of perfumes, the production of vegetable oils and biodiesel, and other industries.
Liquid–liquid extraction is possible in non-aqueous systems: In a system consisting of a molten metal in contact with molten salts, metals can be extracted from one phase to the other. This is related to a mercury electrode where a metal can be reduced, the metal will often then dissolve in the mercury to form an amalgam that modifies its electrochemistry greatly. For example, it is possible for sodium cations to be reduced at a mercury cathode to form sodium amalgam, while at an inert electrode (such as platinum) the sodium cations are not reduced. Instead, water is reduced to hydrogen. A detergent or fine solid can be used to stabilize an emulsion, or third phase.
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References: * Szlag, Giuliano. A Low-Cost Aqueous Two Phase System for Enzyme Extraction. Biotechnology Techniques 2:4:277. 1988 * Dreyer, Kragl 3. ^ Danil de Namor, A.F.; T. Hill (1983). Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions: 2713. 5. ^ M. Filiz, N.A. Sayar and A.A. Sayar, Hydrometallurgy, 2006, 81, 167–173. 6. ^ Yoshinari Baba, Minako Iwakuma and Hideto Nagami, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res, 2002, 41, 5835–5841. 7. ^ J. M. Sánchez, M. Hidalgo, M. Valiente and V. Salvadó, Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange, 1999, 17, 455–474. 10. ^ P. Giridhar, K.A. Venkatesan, T.G. Srinivasan and P.R. Vasudeva Rao, Hydrometallurgy, 2006, 81, 30–39. 11. ^ K. Takeshita, K. Watanabe, Y. Nakano, M. Watanabe (2003). "Solvent extraction separation of Cd(II) and Zn(II) with the organophosphorus extractant D2EHPA and the aqueous nitrogen-donor ligand TPEN". Hydrometallurgy 70: 63–71.

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