Life Span Development

Powerful Essays
Lifespan Development
83
rate or flag this pageTweet this
By Wyldflwr
[pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic]Lifespan Development
Lifespan Development
The study of lifespan development grew out of Darwin’s desire to understand evolution. The first study of children was published by G. Stanley Hall. Hall’s book introduced norms and adolescence to scientists (Boyd & Bee, 2006). Lifespan is the period of time from conception extending to death. This paper will define the development of humans throughout the lifespan and describe the characteristics of the lifespan perspective. Human development domains and periods will be identified and contemporary concerns as related to lifespan development will be identified.
Lifespan Development Defined
Lifespan development is a process beginning at conception that continues until death. The progression initiates with the emergence of a fetus from a one-celled organism. As the unborn child enters the world the environment in which the child exists begins to influence the child’s development (WGBH Educational Foundation, 2001). Lifespan development can be defined as a methodical, intra-individual change associated with progressions corresponding to age. The development progresses in a manner implicating the level of functioning. According to Levinson the life cycle consists of four 25 year eras. The main developmental periods are child and adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood and late adulthood. Each era’s transition involves a necessary change in the character of the individual’s life and sometimes takes up to six years to complete the change (Smith, 2009). The study of human development began with Darwin and other evolutionists. Darwin thought if he studied human development he could further prove his theory of evolution (Boyd & Bee, 2006).
Characteristics of the Lifespan Perspective
The lifespan perspective argues that significant modifications take place throughout development. The lifelong perspective



Bibliography: American Psychiatric Association. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994. Bronfenbrenner, Urie. The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979. Efran, Jay, Mitchell Greene, and Robert Gordon. "Lessons of the New Genetics." Family Therapy Networker 22 (1998):26-41. Locke, John. "Some Thoughts concerning Education." In R. H. Quick ed., Locke on Education. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1892. Loehlin, John, Lee Willerman, and Joseph Horn. "Human Behavior Genetics." Annual Review of Psychology 38 (1988):101-133. Lykken, David. The Antisocial Personality. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1995. McGee, Mark, and Thomas Bouchard. "Genetics and Environmental Influences on Human Behavioral Differences." Annual Review of Neuroscience 21 (1998):1-24. McGuffin, Peter, and Michael Pargeant. "Major Affective Disorder." In Peter McGuffin and Robin Murray eds., The New Genetics of Mental Illness. London: Butterworth-Heinemann, 1991. Newman, H. H., F. N. Freeman, and K. J. Holzinger. Twins: A Study of Heredity and Environment. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1937. Plomin, R. Genetics and Experience: The Interplay between Nature and Nurture. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1994. Plomin, Robert, J. C. DeFries, and John Loehlin. "Genotype-Environment Interaction and Correlation in the Analysis of Human Behavior." Psychological Bulletin 84 (1977):309-322. Scarr, Sandra. "Behavior-Genetic and Socialization Theories of Intelligence: Truce and Reconciliation." In R. J. Sternberg and E. L. Grigorenko eds., Intelligence, Heredity, and Environment. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Scarr, Sandra, and Richard Weinberg. "The Minnesota Adoption Studies: Genetic Differences and Malleability." Child Development 54 (1983):260-267. Waddington, C. H. The Strategy of the Genes. London: Allen and Unwin, 1957. Wahlstein, Douglas. "The Intelligence of Heritability."Canadian Psychology 35 (1994):244-259.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    3. McLerney, J., & Robstein, M. (2008, September 16). Behavioral Genetics. In Ornl.gove. Retrieved April 4, 2013…

    • 542 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    PSY 330 Week 2 DQ2

    • 524 Words
    • 2 Pages

    One of the goals of behavioral genetics is to identify the heritability of a particular behavior. Heritability is the amount of variance in observed behaviors among people that can be explained by genetics. Review this week’s reading and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of some of the methods used to determine heritability in humans. Address the use of adoption studies and twin studies, as well as shared environmental factors and unique environmental factors.…

    • 524 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The brain is the central focus of the study of biopsychology, and researchers have determined that the brain’s functions are responsible for human behavior; research has determined the neuroplasticity theory of the brain changing based on both genetics and experience. The neuroplasticity of the human brain can be used as an example of why it is important to consider how much of behavior is based on genetics and how much is based on environment; however, it would be difficult if not impossible to determine what portion of behavior is nature or…

    • 396 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    * Behavior Genetics Perspective – is about how much our genes and environment influence our individual differences.…

    • 567 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The smallest of the endocrine gland which is located in the brain, is the pineal gland. The gland is responsible for when a person sleeps and wakes by releasing the hormone name melatonin. Genes which give us different heredity characteristics do have an effect on our behavior; but not on a single gene. Behaviors are complex and involve various genes among many other factors; genetics are just partly what affects our behaviors. As a complex attribute behavior is affected by both genetics and environmental aspects. Although the existence of specific hereditary factors boost or diminish the effects of others, when the genetic and environmental factors act together they show the most effect on human behavior. Morris, P (2000). Shows his opinion on how we have to understand the influence of both hereditary and environment on human behavior, some traits are purely genetics, and these traits have a high heritability; other traits are strongly influenced by the individual’s environment, and their heritability is low; many traits.…

    • 586 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Cited: American Psychiatric Association. (2000). American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition ed.). Washington: American Psychiatric Association.…

    • 1557 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    Coun 646 Research Paper

    • 4382 Words
    • 18 Pages

    References: American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.…

    • 4382 Words
    • 18 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    First, Michael, M.D., ed. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV-TR. Vol. 4 Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2000. Print.…

    • 2442 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    CH 43 Review Assessment

    • 1599 Words
    • 13 Pages

    The similarity in the behavior of identical twins, even if separated at birth, is evidence that behavior is due to environmental influences.…

    • 1599 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    References: Wilson, J. F. (2013). Biological Basis of Behavior. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.…

    • 2063 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    2) In which field of study do researchers attempt to identify the effects of heredity on psychological characteristics? -behavioral genetics…

    • 2282 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Amnestic Disorder

    • 1092 Words
    • 5 Pages

    References: American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th ed. text revised. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2000.…

    • 1092 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    References: American Psychiatric Association. (2003). DSM Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Retrieved March 6, 2004, from http://www.psych.org/research/dsm/dsmintro81301.cfm http://www.psych.org/research/dsm/dsm_faqs/faq81301.cfm…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    One of the major issues that a researcher of nature vs. nurture dilemma encounters is determining how much influence genes and environment have on traits (Santrock, 2009). It is somewhat difficult to determine whether a trait is formed through heredity or from the environment (Ceci & Williams, 2000). One way in which researchers go about the process is by studying twins. Researchers study the behavioral similarities between identical twins and that of fraternal twins. Fraternal twins are no more genetically alike than regular brothers and sisters while identical twins are…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Nature vs. Nurture

    • 1394 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Plomin R, Owen MJ, McGuffin P. 1994. The genetic basis of complex human behaviors. Science…

    • 1394 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays