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Lexical Cohesion In Native And Non-Native Article Analysis

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Lexical Cohesion In Native And Non-Native Article Analysis
II. Application Part: This research paper explores cohesion in media discourse. The analysis tackles lexical cohesion in native and non-native articles in order to investigate the distinction between them. Lexical cohesion is the role played by the selection of vocabulary in order to link and hold text together. Lexical cohesion is categorized into two major sections: reiteration and collocation. Reiteration includes, for instance, repetition, hyponyms, synonyms, and antonyms. The analysis is applied to a non-native article written by Lubna Abdel Aziz The Food We Eat, Al Ahram weekly, and a native one by Mark Bittman Eating Food That's Better for You, Organic or Not, New York Time Magazine.
Article 1 : The Food We Eat, Al Ahram weekly.
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By doing so, the writer achieves a coherent point of view as well as avoiding redundancy.
1.1.4 Antonyms Antonyms' can be simply described as a pair of two opposite lexical items. Examples in text 1 can be found as follows:
Example 1: eggs are good, eggs are bad.
Example 2: out with fat, in with fat.
Example 3: They may be less dangerous but not altogether harmless. How much will that apple or banana cost, if it is organically grown, sometimes a little more, often a lot more.
Example 4 : The increased crop, as well as the level of crop protection through the introduction of resistance against plant diseases, makes GM food an irresistible method of expanding the food industry. Growing plants or animals with genetic organism that are resistant to viruses, bacteria, etc. The use of antonyms helps the reader to grasp the idea behind the text . This is obvious in example 1,2,3. The writer mentions various antonyms to deliver the meaning.
Article 2: Eating Food That's Better for You, Organic or Not, New York Time Magazine.
2. Lexical cohesion
2.1Reiteration
2.1.1 Repetition
Example 1: organic food recurs many times in the
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Unlike text 1, example 1 : Much of the nation’s organic food is as much a part of industrial food production as midwinter grapes, and becoming more. Midwinter grapes is a specific kind o f organic food. Synonyms
Example1: in paragraph 3, word like carefully and sanely have the same connotations.
Antonyms2.1.3
Example 1: It seems to have become the magic cure-all,synonymous with eating well, healthfully, sanely, even ethically. But eating “organic” offers no guarantee of any of that. And the truth is that most Americans eat so badly.
The examples show that antonyms signal opposition or contrast to the previously-given information.
III Conclusion and Further

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