Leadership Models

Topics: Leadership / Pages: 7 (1566 words) / Published: Jun 6th, 2010
Leadership Models

Leadership Models The dynamics of leadership-follower relationships has grown in the last two decades because of a growing discussion in leadership literature (Popper & Mayseless, 2002) as cited in Avolio. Many companies, which were small 20 years ago have emerged as leaders in the market, overtaking their once larger competitors. These firms internally have revamped the way they do business. They have focused on making changes to their managerial process, thereby creating a competitive advantage (Tichy & Devanna, 1990). The authors go on to say that although traditional managerial skills are important they are not sufficient to bring about organizational transformation. Transformational change will come by incorporating new strategies about people and the structure of the firm. These strategies may include leadership models or theories. A number of leadership models or theories exist, which address change in the way a firm addresses the management of its employees. The contingency view of leadership states there is not a particular model of leadership that is better than another, but rather various situational contingencies determine the success of different types and styles of leadership (Nahavandi, 2006). Of the many number of leadership models four are notable for change. These four consist of trait theory, behavioral theory, charismatic approach to leadership, and the cognitive resource model. A discussion of how each model addresses contemporary leadership issues and challenges follows. The trait approach to leadership has been referred to as the “Great Man” approach, which includes identifying specific traits a person exhibits. Those traits would be used to identify that person as either a potential leader or as a follower. Researchers have spent considerable time attempting to identify traits that would help to identify leaders from followers. Clawson (2006) states that whereas there have been many



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