Leader vs Follower

Powerful Essays
Topics: Sociology, Charisma
Title:
Who wants to play `follow the leader? ' A theory of charismatic relationships based on routinized... By: Weierter, Stuart J.M., Leadership Quarterly, 10489843, Summer97, Vol. 8, Issue 2
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WHO WANTS TO PLAY `FOLLOW THE LEADER? ' A THEORY OF CHARISMATIC RELATIONSHIPS BASED ON ROUTINIZED CHARISMA AND FOLLOWER CHARACTERISTICS
Contents
1. ROUTINIZED CHARISMATIC MESSAGE
2. CHARISMATIC RELATIONSHIPS
3. LEADER 'S CHARISMATIC MESSAGE
4. ROLE OF PERSONAL CHARISMA
5. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FOLLOWER
6. Self-Monitoring
7. Clarity of the Self-Concept
8. MAINTENANCE OF THE RELATIONSHIP
9. CONTEXTUAL FACTORS THAT IMPACT THE CHARISMATIC RELATIONSHIP
10. ROUTINIZATION OF THE CHARISMATIC RELATIONSHIP
11. ORGANIZATIONAL IMPLICATIONS
12. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS AND CONCLUSION
13. REFERENCES
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This paper outlines a theory of charismatic relationships based on the individual orientation of the follower and extent of charismatic message routinization. A model is proposed that addresses three different types of charismatic relationships--socialized, personalized, and social contagion--and describes the role of follower 's self-monitoring, self-concept clarity, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. Seven propositions based on these perspectives are presented, and the paper concludes with an outline of the model in an organizational context and possible research strategies to test the validity of the theory.
Editor 's Note: This article is the 1996 Kenneth E. Clark Research Award Winner sponsored by the Center for Creative Leadership and also successfully completed the normal Leadership Quarterly editorial review process. Congratulations to the author.
There is essentially nothing to leadership but to carefully observe people 's conditions and know them all, in both upper and lower echelons. When people 's inner conditions are thoroughly understood, then inside and outside are in harmony. If the leader



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