Preview

Latin America colonial times

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1081 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Latin America colonial times
4. How does colonialism engage with notions of spirituality, witchcraft, and/or (ritual) intoxication? You may analyze how the distinctions between orthodox and unorthodox practices were distinguished (and oftentimes blurred). You may look at Staden, the readings on witchcraft and “superstition,” etc.

Beginning in 1492 when the Spanish under the crown of Castile invaded the Americas, where their first settlement was in Santo Domingo, their main motivations were trade and the spread of the Catholic faith through indigenous conversions and economic gain. Due to these objectives they intervened and attempted to change every facet of the indigenous way of life including their ‘notions of spirituality, witchcraft, and intoxication’. The indigenous population had formally been removed from the jurisdiction of the inquisition by order of King Phillip the second in 1571, however the native people of Mexico and other invaded lands of the Americas were still prosecuted on accounts of witchcraft or being Nauatil (witches).
Colonialism engaged with notions of spirituality and witchcraft by asserting their dominance in attempts to completely annihilate these practices. They attempted to make sense of what they did not understand by attributing these happenings to witchcraft and condemning those prosecuted as witches. Further, as previously mentioned, they attempted to spread the Catholic religion by deeming the religious practices previously ‘inherited’ (treatise on Heathen superstition) by the indigenous population as acts of witchcraft.
In his letter to Reverend Don Francisco Manso de Zunga, Hernando Ruiz de Alarcon a Spanish navigator of the sixteenth centaury wrote that the reasons behind attempting to completely eradicate the superstitious ways of the people he regarded as Indians was that some of their practices such as “drunkenness was not permitted to them even in their heathen state” and was punishable by death. (39) His reasons behind “scraping of drunkenness

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    In Colonial Latin America, the conversion of indigenous people to Catholicism took off in 1493. Catholicism was the religion of choice because the Europeans conquering Latin America were from the parts of Europe that practiced Catholicism such as Spain, Belgium and Portugal. The rise of Catholicism would enter England as well with Queen Mary’s reign from 1553-1558. However, Spain had a larger role in sending missionaries to Colonial Latin America than England. England is referenced to provide prospective of the Catholic Church’s reach in the late 1400s-1500s. Catholicism was expanding across the world. At this time many natives already had religious and cultural practices of their own that involved cannibalism, Indian style music and other unorthodox practices that…

    • 1720 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Therefore, the events occurring within England during the 17th century strongly influenced developments throughout England’s Atlantic colonies. In truth, the events in England would not only be replayed in North America, they would be expanded upon as colonists sought to forge a new existence in a largely unknown continent. In this environment, the British colonists of North America earnestly believed that their daily lives were constantly affected by both the divine intervention of Christ and the maliciousness of Satan. With this in mind, it is little wonder that the colonial psyche often associated religious or social dissent as Lucifer working within their community to recruit followers to his designs. Consequently, the seeds for the fear of witchcraft were…

    • 1596 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Religion impacted colonial development in seventeenth- century North America by causing social, political, and economic spheres of colonial life in different regions to be affected by religious expectations.…

    • 672 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first Catholic priests came to South America with the conquistadors and through social and political force superimposed 16th century Catholicism upon conquered peoples and in subsequent generations upon slaves arriving in the New World. Catholicism has, likewise, frequently absorbed, rather than confronted, popular folk religious beliefs. The resulting religion is often overtly Catholic but covertly pagan. Behind the Catholic facade, the foundations and building structure reflect varying folk religious traditions. (2)…

    • 433 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Latin American Empires

    • 504 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Chapter 18 entitled Colonial Encounters narrates the ways in which encounters among European empires and peoples of Africa and Asia brought about oppression, abusive labor relations, and poverty to some African, Latin American, or Asian colonies. Discuss the relationship between empires and its colonies, how does Strayer depict empires, is he overly sympathetic to the colonies and its peoples, provide examples and explain.…

    • 504 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Colonial Period

    • 682 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Writings in the Colonial period in American Literature changed many aspects of the world today. Literature included many new authors, themes, and genres. The colonial life of the 1600s had a huge impact on the literature that was produced during that time. “Their hearts are filled with grace and love, And from the world are borne above” William Bradford. Many of which described the lifestyle of colonists, how the authors were making an impact, and how it changed the world today.…

    • 682 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In order to discuss the racial composition of Colonial Latin America, we must first examine the three civilizations that were present when the Europeans reached Latin America. The three civilizations present were: Mayans, Aztecs and Incans which could be considered native Indians. The people of Latin America are a mixture of racial groupings that include native Indians, white Europeans, black Africans.…

    • 1074 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Colonial Era

    • 318 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Was a well known preacher that took part in the Great Awakening (rise of Christianity)…

    • 318 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Colonial America

    • 2054 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Writing in 1782, J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur tried to define "the American, this new man." He was, Crèvecoeur argued, "neither a European nor a descendant of a European" but an "American, who, leaving behind all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds." Crèvecoeur presumed that America was a melting pot, that the environment created a homogeneous American culture, with similar values, beliefs, and social practices. Such cultural uniformity is inherently plausible. After all, most white colonial Americans worked the soil, enjoying the fruits of their labor, and practiced similar Protestant faiths. Moreover, they believed in private ownership of the means of production by individual cultivators. Generations of scholars, following the lead of Frederick Jackson Turner in the early twentieth century, argued that free and open land on the frontier created an American people whose identity was shaped by the independence land ownership provided and whose ideology was characterized by individualism, democracy, and equality of opportunity.…

    • 2054 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Colonial Period

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages

    ! ! During the early seventeenth to eighteenth century exploration and colonization were very prominent between the European countries. Columbus had discovered North America but went south and explored and colonized parts of what is now Mexico and South America. After Columbus many groups of Englishmen, Frenchmen, Germans, Scots, Irishmen and many others attempted to colonize and build a colony in the new world. but the force of geographic conditions peculiar to America and difficulty of maintaining old world ways in a raw, new continent caused significant changes. But the result was a new social pattern that resembled European culture in many ways had a distinct American character. ! ! The first shiploads of immigrants who came to what is now United States crossed the Atlantic more than a hundred years after the groups of explorers explored North America. During that time, Spanish colonies had been established in Mexico, the West Indies, and South America. These travelers to North America came in little overloaded ships. During their six- to twelve-week voyage, they lived with very little to eat. Many of the ships were lost in storms, many passengers died of disease, and infants rarely survived the journey. While sailing at times the storms would be so bad it would throw ships off course and it would take a long time to get back on track. Th travelers after enduring storms and sickness and even the death of their loved ones had a huge sigh of relief when the land of America was in sight. Their first glimpse of the new land was a forest of dense woods. ! When they began settling the land the travelers realized that this land was abundant with plenty of vegetation and animals for food. The sea was full of oysters and crabs, cod and lobster; and in the woods, there were turkeys and quail, squirrels,…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    geography

    • 2186 Words
    • 7 Pages

    This essay will look at colonialism in Latin America and Africa and the legacy that was left behind.…

    • 2186 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Spanish Colonization

    • 5756 Words
    • 24 Pages

    Although they were not the first Europeans in the Philippines, the first well documented arrival of western Europeans in the archipelago was the Spanish expedition led by Portuguese Ferdinand Magellan, which first sighted the mountains of Samar at dawn on 16 March 1521 (Spanish calendar), making landfall the following day at the small, uninhabited island of Homonhon at the mouth of the Leyte Gulf.[1] Magellan had abandoned his Portuguese citizenship and became a Spanish subject prior to his contract with Spain. On Easter Sunday, 31 March 1521 (Spanish calendar), at Masao, Butuan, (now in Agusan Del Norte), he solemnly planted a cross on the summit of a hill overlooking the sea and claimed possession of the islands he had seen for Spain, naming them Archipelago of Saint Lazarus.[2]…

    • 5756 Words
    • 24 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    [ 10 ]. Allan Greer, Editor. The Jesuit Relations: Natives and Missionaries in Seventeenth Century North America. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000.…

    • 2135 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The late 1600s bridged a time in the New World where religion was highly valued and superstitions, established from a previous time, ran rampant. Over several centuries ago, from the 1300s-1600s, England was experiencing its own type of witchcraft craze as it went through the process of executing thousands of people for their supposed misdeeds. After putting into place, appealing, reformatting and reenacting various acts all of which, in their own manner, banned supernatural acts and resulted in the death of many, England had finally seemed to move past this elongated obsession, just in time to pass it onto their fellow Englishmen in the New World. Due to the past exposures of hysteria and the already traumatic events occurring in the area,…

    • 1719 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Eduardo Galeano is a passionate journalist and writer, a man that has put this passion into writing about the lost or often overlooked histories of Latin and South Americas. In one of his acclaimed books, Las venas abiertas de América Latina/Open Veins of Latin America, he looks at the history of exploitation in this place from early European explorers to current United States and European endeavors. In this paper using three examples from Open Veins of Latin America by Eduardo Galeano, will show how Latin America has developed a dependency on foreign entities.…

    • 1078 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays