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Landscapes Can Provide Opportunities to Reflect on the Human Condition. Do You Agree? Must Discuss Two Dawe Poems and Use ‘the Last Stop’ as a Related Text.

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Landscapes Can Provide Opportunities to Reflect on the Human Condition. Do You Agree? Must Discuss Two Dawe Poems and Use ‘the Last Stop’ as a Related Text.
Landscapes can provide opportunities to reflect on the human condition. Do you Agree? Must discuss two Dawe poems and use ‘The Last Stop’ as a related text. Landscapes are diverse and therefore can provide opportunities to reflect on human condition. Basically the landscapes are all visible features of an area and have the ability to create memories or future events. Landscapes are the backdrop to all of lifes experiences and can essentially reflect upon the experiences of being human in a social, cultural and personal context. The poems Enter Without so much as Knocking and Homecoming which were written by Bruce Dawe project a wide range of landscapes to challenge the reader into thinking deeper into societies values. The short film directed by Greg Willcoms ‘Last Stop’ highlights the conclusions society will jump to in reaction to terrorism as a result of 9/11. Through techniques both Dawe and Willcoms have helped the responder to understand the significant way thats landscapes provide opportunities to be able to reflect upon human condition.

Dawe’s poem Enter Without so Much As Knocking is a very consumer driven poem which provides two opposing landscapes that allow reflection on human condition. It draws attention to the criticising, perfectionist society in which all are a part of. From birth till death one becomes obsessed with being perfect and fixing all parts of our lives. The last 5 lines of the 4th stanza ultimately create a stop in all the crazy consumer obsessions; ‘a pure unadulterated fringe of sky, littered with stars no one had got around to fixing yet’. Those lines allow the reader to understand how being self­conscious and feeling the need to fix everything is unnecessary. We get an image of a beautiful landscape, a night sky with thousands of stars everywhere you look; this is natural and is different from anything man made, its special and untouched, its beautiful. ‘he’d watch them circling about in luminous groups like kids at the circus

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