The Spanish colonial migration to the north consisted of three step process; the mission, presidio, and pueblo process. The first step in the process was The Mission, which had full control over the Native people. This means full control as socially, religiously, and even economically. It was up to the mission to make sure the Native people were part of the Spanish culture. They wanted Natives speak Spanish and become part of their society as well as to work. After the Natives become part of that society, a Presidio was set up. The purpose of the Presidio was to guard and protect the Mission and the people in it. Military forces opened land right after the Presidio was set up in order for the Natives to do labor. Finally after everything is set up, the Spaniards can make their own Pueblo. The Pueblo meant that native laborers were always supervised and the Presidio kept outsider away and from coming in.
The categories “sand, desert, river” are very important for understanding Spanish colonial designs. The Native people dependent greatly in these three elements, it was through them that they lived. Water was extremely significant to them, and it was through these elements that they preserved it. People of sand were from a place with low mountain ranges. Because of that, the people there came up with the “floodwater farmin” technique which is still used today. This technique means they collected all the water that fell on a rainy day. This water gave them the chance to grow goods which they used to survive. The Desert people lived in two different places depending on the season. During the Summer, they loved in field villages and during the Winter they lived in mountain homes. The River people, unlike the Sand and Desert people, lived in permanent homes. They had it easier because they always had water since they had streams. All of these people all had a huge respect towards the Earth.
Professor Miguel Dominguez, in the California Mission system, helped me

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