Korematsu V. the United States (1944)

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Literary Analysis and Composition II (Sem2) | What’s Important | Lesson 4

LACII Unit 1, Lesson 4
Self-Check Answers
Vocabulary: Words in Context
Read the sentences below. Use the context clues to determine the meanings of the new words. Check your answers using the definitions at the bottom of the pages 57–58 of your Explorations anthology. 1. Graham admired the scholars he met while working at the library because they never seemed to tire of learning new things or seeking out original ideas in the volumes they read. learned people devoted to study 2. The perpetual struggle between good and evil is at the heart of many great works of literature. ongoing; everlasting; continuing forever 3. Sam came over to my house on the pretense of wanting to ask me a question, but I knew the real reason he came was because he had a crush on my sister. false appearance or intention

Powerful Words
1. Compare how the speaker in this poem feels about his father to the way Jerry feels about his father in “President Cleveland, Where Are You?” How are the fathers different? How are they similar? Use textual evidence to support your answer. Both Jerry and the speaker in this poem admire and respect their fathers a great deal. From Jerry’s descriptions of his father, the man seems more boisterous than the gentlemen described in “My Father Is a Simple Man.” Jerry’s father is known to sing songs and is described as always having a beer in his hand on Friday night. The father in “My Father Is a Simple Man” is more subdued. The speaker does not describe his father as particularly humorous or lively. Yet what he lacks in energy he seems to make up for with patience and dignity. Despite the obvious differences between them, both men have an impact on their children and both children ultimately wish to honor and respect their fathers.

Vocabulary: Unlocking Words
Read the sentence, and choose how you would define the underlined word. 1. I’m disappointed that you would perpetuate a

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