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Korean Conflict In The Cold War: The Korean War

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Korean Conflict In The Cold War: The Korean War
Hot Conflict in the Cold War: The Korean War

David Moore
POLS 263
Instructor Morehouse
December 13, 2012

The 1950’s were an unstable time in world history. The world had been divided by two opposing schools of thought: Capitalism and Communism. The Cold War was started after the Allied Powers victory in World War II. Not long after, the Soviet Union began nuclear testing and became the second super power to have atomic weapons. The threat of global annihilation was at an all-time high during these times. The world was still in shambles after the war to end all wars, so when smaller countries began falling to the dreaded red terror, the United Nations had to start taking a stance. In a terrifying turn of events, the United States,
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United Nations military aid consisting mostly of United States but also including combat forces from over ten other countries forces were brought in after North Korean forces crossed the 38th Parallel into South Korea in 1950(Carter, 2010, pg 165). Chinese forces would eventually aid the North Korean regime with troop and the Soviets would give North Korea and China material aid during this conflict. After an indecisive “police action” that lasted for three years, an armistice was agreed upon at the 38th Parallel and a tenuous peace has been between North and South ever since. It is the findings of this report that the Korean War started as a civil war that then escalated out of control into an international proxy war and eventually became an unsettled conflict thanks to a combination of a lack of foresight by the Allied Powers, hegemonic intervention, the scare of nuclear weapons. Although there is an armistice, no true end to the war has come about, and it will not happen until North and South Korea are united under one sovereign domestic …show more content…
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