Knowledge Management

Topics: Knowledge management, Management / Pages: 15 (3642 words) / Published: Mar 18th, 2013
Introduction The business world at large has embraced the old adage that says knowledge is power, and this is reflected in the way organisations now view knowledge. Knowledge has become one of the key resources organisations utilise in their business strategies hence the need to manage it. The field of Knowledge Management is considered fairly new and it has generated a lot of interest within the business circles with individual companies investing a lot of resources in its development and establishment within their organisations. This paper is focusing on the description and evaluation of the linkages between knowledge management and business strategy with the use of examples from my company, Thermal Air Conditioning (Private) Limited thereafter referred to as Thermal. The definitions of the two terms, knowledge management and business strategy will give a background which will be followed by the descriptive and evaluative component of this discussion.

Knowledge Management Knowledge Management, according to Levinson, M., (1998) is the process through which organisations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge based assets. More often, generating value from such assets involves codifying what employees, partners and customers know, and sharing that information among employees and departments. Another school of thought views knowledge management as comprising a range of strategies and practises used in an organisation to identify, create, represent, distribute and enable adoption of insights and experiences. Such insights and experiences comprise knowledge, either embedded in individuals or embedded in organisations as processes. A similarly broad definition is presented by Davenport, T. and Prusak, L., (2000), which states that knowledge management is managing the corporation’s knowledge through a systematically organisationally specified process of acquiring, organising, sustaining, applying, sharing and renewing both the tacit and explicit



References: 1. Bresman, H., Birkinshaw, J. And Nobel, R., (1999), “Knowledge Transfer in International Acquisitions” Journal of International Business Studies, Vol 30 No 3 pp.439-462. 2. Cohen. And Prusak, L., (2001) In Good Company: How Social Capital Makes Organisations Work, Harvard Business School Press, Boston. 3. Cohen, W.M., Knowledge for Development (1998) The World Bank. 4. Cummings, J., Knowledge Sharing: A Review of Literature The World Bank, Washington DC. 5. Davenport, T. And Prusak, L. (1998), Working knowledge; How organisations manage what they know, Harvard Business school. 6. Davenport T.H., De long, D.W., and Beers, M.C. “successful K.M projects”; Sloan Management Review, Winter (1998). 7. Davenport, T.H., Jarvenpaa, and Beers, M.C., Improving Knowledge of work. “Sloan Management Review Vol. 37, Summer 1996, pp 53-65. 8. Frost, A.,(2010) “Knowledge Management and the Role of IT” M. Sc. 9. Grant, R.M., (1996) “Towards a Knowledge based view of the firm” strategic management Journal Vol. 17, pp109-22. 10. Hansen, M.T., Nohrian, N and Tierney T., What’s your strategy for Managing Knowledge? Harvard Business School Publishing. 11. Heisig, P. (2001) “Business Process oriented Knowledge Management”, in Mertins, K., Heisig, P. And Vorbeck, J. (Eds), Knowledge management: Best Practises in Europe, Springer, Heidelberg, pp13-36. 12. Kogut, B., and Zander, U, (1992) “Knowledge of the firm, combinative capabilities, and the replication of technology”, Organisation science Vol 3 No.3, pp383-97. 13. Mintzberg, H, Ahlotrand, B and Lampel, J 1998; Strategy Safari: A Guided tour through the worlds of Strategic management, Free press, Network. 14. March, J.G., (1991), “Exploration and Exploitation in Organisational Learning” Organisational Science Vol 2. No.1, pp.71-87 10 15. Nelson, R. (1990) “On technological capabilities & their acquisition,” On R.E Evenson and G. Ranis, Editors, Science and Technology Lessons for development policy, Boulder, CO: Westview Press: 71-80. 16. Nelson, R., Rosenberg, N., (1993),”Technical Innovation and National Systems” chapter 1 in R.R., editor, National Innovation Systems: A Comparative Analysis, New York: Oxford University Press. 17. Nonaka, I. 1994, A Dynamic Theory of Organisational Knowledge (Real; Organisational Science) Vol.5 No.1 pp14-37. 18. Prusak, L., (1998), ‘Why knowledge, Why now?’ On the strategic Management of intellectual Capital, D.A. Klein(Ed), Butterworth-Heinemann, Boston. 19. Ruggles, R. 1997, ‘Tools for knowledge Management: An introduction’ in K.M. tools, R.L. 20. Snowden, D. (2000a), ‘Knowledge Elicitation: indirect Knowledge Discovery, Part two of Basics of Organic Knowledge Management.’, Vol 3 No.9. 21. Stewart, T., (1997), Intellectual Capital: The New Wealth of Organisations, Niolidas Brealey Publishing, London. 22. Saito, A., Unemoto, K., Ikeda, M., A Strategy-based Ontology of Knowledge Management technologies. 23. Teece, D.J., Pisano, G., and Shuen, A (1997), “Dynamic Capabilities and Strategic Management,” Strategic Management Journal, Vol 18. No.7 pp509-33. 24. Zack, M., (1999) ‘Developing a Knowledge Strategy’ California Management Review, Vol. 41, No.3, Spring, pp125-45. 11

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • The Knowledge and Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Management