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Know the Structure of Education from Early Years to Post Compulsory Education

By aj777999 Jan 19, 2013 1305 Words
Know the structure of education from early years to post-compulsory education.

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4.1
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All 3 and 4 year olds in England are entitled to receive a free, part time early year’s education. They are entitled to 15 hours a week, for 38 weeks of the year. This is part of the Every Child Matters agenda, which is a government initiative for England and Wales, and its main aims are for every child, whatever their background or circumstances, to have the support they need to; * be healthy

* stay safe
* enjoy and achieve
* make a positive contribution
* achieve economic wellbeing,
and the Childcare Act 2006, which works in conjunction with the Every Child Maters agenda, and formalises the important strategic role of local authorities through a set of duties requiring them to; * work with their NHS and jobcentre partners to improve the outcomes of all children up to five and reduce inequalities between them secure sufficient childcare for working parents * provide a parental information service

* Provide information, advice and training for childcare providers. There are different types of childcare options available for 0-5 year old within this provision of early year’s education. These include * Sure start children’s centres; these work with parents from child’s birth, providing early years education, full day care, short term care, health and family support and parenting advise. * Nursery schools; providing early learning and childcare for child aged 3-5, often linked to a primary school * Playschools and pre-schools; providing part time and early learning for under 5s. Three and four year olds are entitled to their 15 hours of free early year’s education with these providers. * Nurseries; providing care and early years education from birth to five * Reception class; the early years curriculum framework runs from ages 3-5 and therefore is used in reception class and school nurseries. Learning in the early years is based on adults working alongside children on focused activities, and learning through play.

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There are four main types of mainstream state school. These schools are funded by local authorities, and they have to follow the National Curriculum. There is the community school, which is owned and run by the local authority. This will also support the school by developing links with the local community, and providing support services. Foundation schools are run by their own governing body. They determine the admissions policy working with the local education authority. The school, land and buildings will be owned by a charity foundation or the governing body. A trust school is a type of foundation school but will form a charitable trust with an outside partner. The governing body and parents will make the decision to become a trust school. Specialist schools are secondary school that can apply for specialist status. This is done to develop a subject or subjects, and receive government funding for doing so. Voluntary schools come under two categories; the voluntary aided and the voluntary controlled. Voluntary aided schools are mainly religious schools, although anybody can apply for a place. They are run by their own governing body but the land and buildings are usually owned by a religious organisation or charity. They are funded by the governing body, charity and local education authority. Voluntary controlled schools are run and funded by the local authority land and buildings are usually own by a charity. Independent schools are not funded by the local education authority. They are funded by the parents who pay fees, and also income they make from investments gifts and charitable endowments. Most have charitable status and so can claim tax exemption. Unlike mainstream state schools they do not need to follow the National Curriculum, and the admissions policy is decided by the head teacher and the governors. Academies used to be set up by sponsors, but new government policies have allowed more schools to be granted academies status. They are not maintained by the local education authority and so have more freedom then state schools.

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Post 16 options for young people and adults.
* As and a levels; usually studied for two years.
* Diplomas; a new qualification that combines classroom and practical learning. Available at three levels-foundation, higher and advanced, and usually studied over 2 years. * Nvqs; there are 5 levels of NVQ, and people usually choose to study them to compliment a paid or voluntary job, for example, someone working in an admin office roe may take an NVQ in Business and Administration. * Apprenticeships; these give you training and experience in a ‘hands on’ role, whilst helping you work towards a qualification. * BTECS;

* There are six levels available, which are equivalent to GCSE (levels 1 and 2), A-level (level 3), and university degree (level 4-6). * Employment; some pupils may leave school and go straight into employment.

Understand how schools are organised in term of roles and responsibilities.

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Within a school setting there are many different people serving different roles and responsibilities. The school governor’s main responsibilities are to set aims and objectives for the school and to adopt new policies and targets that help achieve these aims and objectives. The team of school governors is usually a team of 10-20 people, all who have links to the school and the local community. There will be at least one parent governor and one staff governor, as well as the school Head. There will also be a local authority governor and a local community governor. The governors will work closely with the school Head Teacher and the senior management within the school, and will be based on different committees responsible for different areas of the school management. The senior management team is made up of the schools more experienced staff the head teacher and deputy head, year group leaders, SENCO, and foundation stage leader. These will usually meet on a regular basis to discuss anything they feel important and to make decisions that concern running the school. In my school this happens on a Monday morning, and any information that needs to be passed on to other members of staff will then be passed on via the concerned person, in my case usually the class teacher or the SENCO. Other staff are required legally in a school setting, aside from the Head Teacher and Deputy Head. The SENCO is responsible for the children with special educational needs within the school, and will work closely with other school staff, external professionals and parents in providing the appropriate care for such children. In a primary school there will also be a Foundation Stage Manager, who ensures that the Early Years Foundation Stage is meeting statutory requirements. The teachers are responsible for planning and preparing the curriculum for the pupils, and to teach to the educational needs of the children in their class. They are also usually responsible for the other adults working in their class. Support staff includes a number of different people who work within a school, with many different roles. These include the catering staff and lunchtime supervisors, who cook or prepare the meals at school and are responsible for the children during lunch time hours. The office and administrative staff who have a number of different responsibilities including dealing with school finances and staff wages and files, and the daily running of the school in terms of taking phone calls, passing on information, preparing letters for parents etc. The school caretaker who is responsible for the maintenance and general upkeep of the school. School club staff who may run school breakfast clubs, or after school clubs. Teaching assistants and individual learning support assistants, who work alongside the teachers and SENCO to support the teaching of children within the school and technicians such as ICT specialists who make sure the resources in a school are working efficiently.

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