kingdom of matthias

Good Essays
Starting in the early 1600’s English settlers began migrating to the Americas in search for liberty and the right to govern themselves in what they deemed a Christian manner. Thomas Morton, was one of the first to write about the Indians of New England. He condemned their religious beliefs claiming it was similar to devil like worship. (VOF,4) The Native Americans were seen to be living a much happier life even without religion, law and a king. This daunted Christian and they did not understand how this could be. It’s written that they claim their prosperity was full of evil and they would lead a happier life once bought to Christianity.(VOF,6) I feel this is the last America sees of true religious freedom. In reality, religious liberty existed in very few parts of the Atlantic world in during this time period. Most nations outlawed religious groups that rulers deems dangerous or disruptive. Among all the colonies, one that demonstrated religious freedom in a higher sense would be Maryland. Cecilius Calvert was a Catholic who wished to demonstrate that Protestants and Catholics could live in peace, something that was not seen in Europe. In 1649 Maryland established an Act Concerning Religion, which introduced religious tolerance, saying that anyone who troubled a Christian due to their religion would be punished.(VOF,27) I feel this allowed others to safely demonstrate “religious freedom”, but this is just one state among the colonies. During this time it was rare to have this type of true freedom. Like many settlers, the puritans came to American in search of liberty, and to govern themselves in what they deemed a Christian manner.(VOF,29) This is where Religious freedom loses the sense of freedom, because the puritans created their own definition of the word freedom. John Winthrop explains that freedom to them meant obedience to God’s laws and the law of rulers such as himself.(VOF,29-30) Basically you can see that they are imposing their moral standards on

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Kingdom of Matthias

    • 10960 Words
    • 44 Pages

    Themes, Style, Historical Context, Critical Overview, Criticism and Critical Essays, Media Adaptations, Topics for Further…

    • 10960 Words
    • 44 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Kingdom of Matthias

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In The Kingdom of Matthias, Paul E. Johnson retells the tale of a religious cult that was founded in the 1820s-1830s. Robert Matthews, an emigrant who grew up in Cambridge, New York, was a member of the orthodox Scots Presbyterian Church, which at the time was an incredibly strict religion that basically taught and believed that people naturally do wrong and commit sinful acts. Elijah Pierson, who later came to be called Elijah the Tishbite was a descendant of Puritans, was raised in a liberal Presbyterian church. The two self-proclaimed prophets created the bizarre religious cult known as the Kingdom of God, which attracted mostly poor men.…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    kingdom of matthias

    • 503 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Kingdom of Matthias tells the story of Robert Matthews, who later took on the name Matthias the Prophet. A religious charlatan in 1830s New York, Matthews established a "Kingdom" of fanatical followers, causing a nationwide scandal.…

    • 503 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Kingdom of Matthias tells the story of a very bizarre religious cult that was founded in New York City in the 1820s. Poor men who were forced by economic necessity took to this religion. Many felt the need to join because of the need for the cult because of the culture of New York City and its members having too much individual ambition.…

    • 456 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The religious repression in New England was a great example of irony. This is so because Puritan separatist groups moved across an ocean to find religious freedom. Some went to Holland, but they quickly realized that Dutch culture was not for them. In consequence, some separatists moved to the New World. When they got to New England and landed at Plymouth Rock, they created a theocratic government. One would be inclined to believe that if you left one-or in some cases, two different countries and sailed all the way across the Atlantic Ocean to find Religious freedom, you would in turn offer it to the inhabitants of your new settlement. Unfortunately, that is not what happened. When New England began to expand and grow more popular, obviously it became more diverse. At this time, there were people moving into New England that did not fit the criteria that the puritans who described themselves as “saints” did. Since they were a theological government, if those not so pure colonists living in New England were not part of the church, they in turn were not a part of the government. These new immigrants now faced a decision. Stay and adapt to the ways of the strict puritans in some of the colonies of New England, or move to a place more tolerant of religious freedom. It is extremely ironic that the same people who moved thousands of miles away to find a place more accepting to their religion did not feel empathy towards the newcomers that were not the same religion as them, they turned them away at the door.…

    • 657 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Religious freedom was the driving force that led the first settlers that arrived on America’s shores in the 1500’s. They wanted to be free from the religious intolerance and forget the past. They were greeted by something that they couldn’t have expected in their wildest dreams, people living there already, and people that had lived on the land for centuries before. These Native Americans were not ready to assimilate and saw these settlers as gods, and began to worship them. The settlers believed that the natives were inferior to them due to their lack of technology, economy, and anything beyond a simple form of government. They used this to their advantage when they exploited the natives by trading unfairly.…

    • 536 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Puritans

    • 610 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The puritans came to the Americas in search of religious freedom but, in their hypocrocy, had no tolerance for the beliefs of others. As was the case of Thomas Morton who was a devout atheist. This was Morton’s only crime, a different religious belief, which lead the puritans to show their true colors, that they were just as intolerant as those who persecuted them in England.…

    • 610 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Kingdom of Matthias, is a book that explains the journey of a man, Matthias and some of his followers in the mid-1800s. Matthias himself, claimed to be a leader of a “new Christian faith,” but his true faith was never revealed. However, it never held up and eventually had its downfall. In the end Matthias was thrown in jail and later released in 1835. From there he headed to Kirtland in search of a Mormon Prophet named Joseph Smith (pg 3). When confronting Smith, Matthias gave a fake name and quickly became “friends.” The shared an enemy in the Finneyite reform, one that Matthias sought to look into. His cult eventually became his end and demolished him from the inside out.…

    • 1192 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Best Essays

    While the challenge of summarizing the effects of church-state relations in America is no small task, it is possible to identify many of the elements collected from history that advanced religious freedom in America. First, the American population consisted of a mix of religions, cultures, languages, and classes. Each religious group believed their ways were the right ways and they exhibited little toleration for others, making an agreement on one established church impossible. Second, what these groups did have in common was their search for freedom to practice their beliefs without persecution, their search for wealth,…

    • 3207 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jehovah´S Witnesses

    • 15439 Words
    • 62 Pages

    As de Tocqueville observed in the mid-nineteenth century, the United States has been a fertile ground for the growth of an “innumerable multitude” of religious sects.2 America was founded and settled in great part by persons who were seeking religious freedom in the new world, which had been denied to them in the old world. The constitutions of the 50 states generally protect such religious freedom. And the first article of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the United States provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. . ..” This language has been interpreted, among other things, to protect all religious beliefs…

    • 15439 Words
    • 62 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Not The Final CHHII 665

    • 4222 Words
    • 14 Pages

    “Religious Liberty” is a good and perfect gift.1 Contrary to populace belief, the expression “separation of church and state” did not originate with the ACLU but with the British Baptists. The honorable hunger for “religious liberty” was a God-given desire that led them to America.2 They arrived in America and carried religious freedom cupped with the horrors associated with coercive religious. They envision a country in which Christians, of different persuasion, could live in brotherly love and shared society and civil affairs. The British Baptists were true defenders of “religious liberty,” for all men, i.e., Turkish, Jewish, Buddist or any other religion.3 Their goal was not merely tolerance but only aimed at absolute, “religious liberty.”4…

    • 4222 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    American Colonies Dbq

    • 667 Words
    • 3 Pages

    "In the 1600's there existed a degree of religious freedom in some colonies, while others were characterized by strict intolerance."…

    • 667 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Searching for a new beginning and seeking religious freedom, early Pilgrims travelled to the New World (America) and fleeing religious oppression of the Old World (Europe). The Pilgrims believe “they were carrying out God’s Will and, as a result, they would become a shining example for the rest of humanity” . This new land free from persecution, subjection, tyranny, and oppression were thought to be a God sent example for all of humanity to follow. In America, the importance of separating church and state was the Pilgrims method of being cautious not to duplicate the problems that religion caused in Europe. This was apparent in the development of Article VI of the Constitution that stated “No religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States”. There was also language to be found in the Bill of Rights that prohibits officially sanctioned U.S. religion—“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof” . America was formed out of the migration of people coming from all over the world and was a country where participation in any religious group was strictly voluntary. With religion being an individual choice of each and ever America, it is not surprising “religion is held in high regard in the United States, …. More than half the U.S. population attends church regularly” (Martin & Rajnandini, 2012, 52). This is an individualistic right that allows Americans to put their own needs and interest ahead of the collective group. As Dr. Seymour Lipset writes, “Americans are…

    • 908 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    When the United States was founded in 1776, it was a nation of Christian individuals. According to One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; “In 1776, every European American, with the exception of about 2,500 Jews, identified himself or herself as a Christian. Moreover, approximately 98 percent of the colonists were Protestants, with the remaining 1.9 percent being Roman Catholics (Kosmin&Lachman).” Although America was never established as an officially Christian nation, it is plain to see that the founding fathers and inhabitants intended for America to follow a code of morality found along the lines of the Bible. Looking at America 200 years later, its people and their culture are not where they started. According…

    • 1080 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The early stages of religious pluralism happened with European colonists, particularly the Puritans. “The Puritans, an ascetic group of Protestants, controlled the social and political life in Massachusetts and other religious practices were not tolerated” (Boisi Center). In other words, Puritans ruled with an “iron fist” and other groups were shunned from society. A particular group identified as the Quakers faced acts of prosecution including banishment and the death penalty. The death penalties consist of hangings, which occur in Boston around 1959 to 1961. However, The United States offered many European colonists an opportunity to create a new life for themselves. “Because of this religious diversity, and because the values of the new nation emphasized freedom of choice and individual responsibility, the Constitution of the United States, ratified in the 1789, was quickly amended to guarantee freedom of religion and the separation of church and state” (Sullivan 2007).…

    • 588 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays