keboarding

Topics: Educational years, High school, Middle school Pages: 54 (11214 words) Published: October 28, 2014
A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE NECESSITY OF RE-TEACHING KEYBOARDING AT THE 6TH GRADE LEVEL

by
Lisa R. Skifstad

A Research Paper
Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the
Master of Science Degree
With a Major in
Career and Technical Education
Approved: 2 Semester Credits

________________________________________
Investigation Advisor

The Graduate School
University of Wisconsin-Stout
August, 2003

ii
The Graduate School
University of Wisconsin-Stout
Menomonie, WI 54751

ABSTRACT

(Writer)

Skifstad
(Last Name)

Lisa
(First)

R.
(Initial)

A Study to Determine the Necessity of Re-Teaching Keyboarding At the 6th Grade Level (Title)
Career and Technical Education
(Graduate Major)

Dr. Carol Mooney
(Research Advisor)

July 2003
(Month/Year)

47
(Pages)

American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual
(Name of Style Manual Used in this Study)

Keyboarding has traditionally been taught at either the middle school or high school level. It was a class that was taught to individuals who would enter clerical fields. However, due to technological advances, keyboarding is no longer an elective course. With the popularity of personal computers, the question is no longer whether to teach keyboarding, but at what grade level should it be taught. In the Eau Claire Area School District keyboarding is formally taught for six weeks at the fourth grade level and then repeated in a nine week keyboarding class at the sixth grade level. Even though the entire nine weeks at the sixth grade level is not dedicated to re-teaching the keyboard, it does take up a significant amount of time. There are students, parents, and teachers that feel that this time should not be spent to re-teach a skill that the student has already learned. This research will assist in determining the need to re-teach keyboarding to students at the sixth grade level.

iii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank many people who have supported me on my quest to obtain my Master’s Degree. My wonderful family support, my husband and three sons were very understanding of all the time I spent away from them. Sue Hughes, Business Education teacher at DeLong Middle School, she was a source of strength and knowledge that I could turn to when needed. Heidi Mahler, the Business Education teacher at South Middle School in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, took the time out of her busy curriculum schedule to give the surveys to her students. And, a special thanks goes out to my thesis advisor, Dr. Carol Mooney, for her support and expertise in guiding me through the completion of my thesis. I could not have completed this paper without these individuals and many others whom guided me through this process.

iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................................... ii LIST OF TABLES......................................................................................................................... vi Chapter I.......................................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................................................. 1 Statement of Problem.................................................................................................................. 3 Purpose of the Study ................................................................................................................... 3 Research Objectives.................................................................................................................... 3 Significance of Study.................................................................................................................. 4 Limitations of the...

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