Kant's Maxims Of Good Will

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"So will such that the maxim of your will could become a universal law for all men."

Kant is saying your actions, based on good will, can apply to all; so that good moral judgments made can become universal for everyone. Kant believed a person’s motive, his intentions of an action are what decides if the action is morally right or wrong—not the end result of that action or decision. Kant’s categorical imperative approach says a person has the moral duty to do what is right, because it is the right thing to do, not because it may benefit them. If a person’s actions or decisions will contradict those maxims, then the action should not be taken.

I agree with Kant’s theory that a person’s motive is what makes a person’s action morally

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