Kant's Antinomies

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Page 6 of 13, Naragon, "Kant's Revolution of the Mind"
In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant presented four very different types of antinomies: the world consisting of indivisible elements, freedom casualty existing, and a necessary being that caused the world. The fourth one stuck out the most. As a very confused individual about religion and the uncertainty about it, the fourth antinomy stuck out the most.The thought of there being an absolutely necessary being (such as God) in the causal chain of beings has been discussed throughout the entire course of history. The statement is whether we can suppose the existence of a God as the being which necessarily exists. The possibility is there that a necessary being could exist, but how probable

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