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Juvenile Justice System

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Juvenile Justice System
THE PROS AND CONS OF A SEPARATE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

Separate Juvenile Justice System

DeVry University
Professor C. Robins
CRMJ300

Katja C. Bonds
August 14, 2011

I. Introduction A. Juvenile 1. Age range for juveniles 2. Delinquent juvenile 3. Young offenders II. History overview of Juvenile Justice System A. Parent Interaction 1. The responsibilities of the parent 2. The responsibilities of the juvenile B. Police Interaction 1. Discretion of circumstances 2. Safety of the juvenile 3. Rights of the juvenile 4. Juvenile protection C. Court System Interaction 1. Decisions of the court 2. Understanding the legal issue regarding juveniles 3. Deciding the best solution/alternative 4. Resolve/follow through in the welfare of the juvenile III. Juvenile Crimes A. Classification of minor crimes for juveniles B. Classification of major crimes for juveniles IV. Juveniles tried as adults A. Juvenile court vs. adult court 1. Prevention 2. Diversion

In today’s society, there are not that many distinctions between juveniles and adults when it comes to the criminal justice system. The main distinction between an adult and a juvenile is of course the age and the types of sentencing a juvenile may receive compared to an adult. The juvenile justice system has a tiered affect when it comes to sentencing but it relies heavily on the maturity and intellect of the juvenile. Due to that reason, there will always be a separate juvenile justice system to ensure the juvenile truly understands the nature of the crime and the consequences.
The severity and brutality of some juvenile crimes has escalated over the past years and the community is outraged along with the parents, the police and the court system. There are some juveniles with such minor infractions as running away, truancy and some simple assault that is related to school fights. Those types of crimes



References: Bohm, R.M & Haley, K.N. (2008). Introduction to criminal justice (5th ed.) New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Peak, K.J. (2007). Justice administration (5th ed.) Reno, NV: Pearson-Prentice Hall Puzzanchera, C. and Kang, W. (2011). "Easy Access to Juvenile Court Statistics: 1985-2008." Online. Available: http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezajcs/ U.S. Department of Juvenile Justice. (2009). Juvenile arrest 2008. (Publication NCJ 228479).Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

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