Judaism Holidays, Texts, and houses of worship

Topics: Judaism, Torah, Halakha Pages: 3 (1037 words) Published: December 4, 2014
Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year and it marks the beginning of the Ten Days of Repentance, which concludes in Yom Kippur. During the Ten Days of Repentance, Jews reflect on their actions during the past year and seek forgiveness from those they may have wronged. Rosh Hashanah is characterized by the blowing of a ram’s horn (shofar) and it is customary to eat apples and honey on these days as a symbol of a wish for a sweet new year. Traditionally observant Jews do not work, attend school, answer the phone, drive or use the computer on Rosh Hashanah. Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is a Day of Atonement and it is the most solemn of Holy Days in the Jewish calendar. This holiday is devoted to fasting and prayer as Jews strive to reaffirm their faith. Traditionally observant Jews do not work, go to school, answer the phone, or use the computer on Yom Kippur. Sukkot

This is the Feat of Tabernacles and it is the fall harvest festival. During this time, Jews construct a temporary structure called a Sukkah, in which they eat and sometimes sleep. The Sukkah is decorated with fruits and vegetables and covered with leaves and vines. The Sukkah symbolizes the dwelling the ancient Israelites used while living in the desert after the Exodus from Egypt. Traditionally observant Jews do not work, go to school, answer the phone, or use the computer on Sukkot. Passover

This is the Festival of Freedom and it celebrates the deliverance of the ancient Israelites from slavery in Egypt. During this holiday, families get together for a festive ritual meal and retell the struggles of the Jewish people to get their freedom. Because the Jews had to flee, they could only take unleavened bread in their escape, so during Passover, Jews eat unleavened bread or matzah. Traditionally observant Jews do not work, go to school, answer the phone, or use the computer on Passover. Shavuot

Shavuot is the Festival of Weeks and it observes the Giving of the Torah. This holiday...
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