John Jefferson Davis On Abortion

Good Essays
Berenice Ramirez
Box No. 259
Essay # 3
2:00 p.m. December 3, 2010.

Abortion Genesis 1:27 says, “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them” (NIV). Human life is sacred because from its beginning it involves the creative action of God. No one can assign the right to destroy directly or indirectly to a human. There are situations in which this right is not fulfilled. For example, in the case of abortion, the duty to not to damage another, is not enforced. Today, some women have the right to take that choice for many reasons, in spite not knowing the difficulties that could bring. The decision to legalize abortion in some states has changed over the years. In Evangelical Ethics, John Jefferson Davis presents the theme of Abortion. Davis says, “Until 1967 abortion was illegal in most states except in cases where the mother’s health was threatened. Between 1967 and 1969, eleven states extended the conditions for ‘therapeutic’
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However, in 1973 the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade did not end the controversy over the morality of this right. As Davis says, “The Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade, handed down on January 22, 1973, dramatically altered the legal situation and effectively gave the United States abortion on demand” (Davis 141). Although the legislation has changed the permitted reasons for an abortion, this legalization has serious effects and consequences to morale. Therefore, legalized abortion affects the morality of the nation, the family by its disintegration and the mother physically and

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