John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

Topics: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, United States Declaration of Independence, Freedom of religion / Pages: 7 (1740 words) / Published: Dec 17th, 2012
Relationship with One Another The relationship between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson was one of the most iconic and symbolic relationships in American history not only for its many ups and downs, but also for its great effects on the founding and governing of America. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams met for the first time in 1775 and almost immediately developed a friendly liking toward each other. For the first two decades of their friendship, Jefferson and Adams constantly exchanged praises and affection to one another. Jefferson described Adams as “so amiable” that anyone would “love him if becoming acquainted.” Adams also wrote to Jefferson that “intimate correspondence with you is one of the most agreeable events in my life.”[1] The two men worked together in the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and also traveled together to France for diplomatic service. When drafting the Declaration of Independence in 1776, both agreed that America should not merge into one national government but should try to establish a confederacy of states instead, in which each state would have a separate government.[2] Adams and Jefferson shared the same view in advocating for reconciliation and calling for Americans to stand up for their independence because they both believed that the country could not be able to progress under ruling of Britain.[3] Adams and Jefferson also together supported the bill of rights in order to protect citizens and other government’s members from presidents’ having limitless power and becoming “tyrants.”[4]
The many common political views shared between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were one of the main reasons that helped tighten the bonding of their friendship during the first two decades. Early 1790s, Adams and Jefferson showed major different views in politics, which started to negatively affect their friendship. In 1793, John Adams wrote about Jefferson: “His soul is poisoned with ambition.”[5] Conflicts between them became



References: Crossen, Cynthia. "We Worship Jefferson, But We Have Become Hamilton 's America." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, February 04, 2004., B1, Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012). Ellis, Joseph J. "HATE LOVE." American History 45, no. 4 (October 2010): 46-51. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012). Gutzman, Kevin R. C. "Thomas Jefferson 's Federalism, 1774-1825." Modern Age 53, no. 3 (Summer2012 2011): 74-80. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012). Lewis, Meriwether. The Expedition of Lewis and Clark. Philadelphia: Bradford and Inskeep, 1966. Witte, John, Jr. "Publick Religion: Adams v. Jefferson." First Things: A Monthly Journal Of Religion & Public Life no. 141 (March 2004): 29-34. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed November 5, 2012). [2] Paul S. Boyer et al., The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People. (Boston, Massachusetts: Wadsworth Pub Co, 2012), 135. [4] Gutzman, Kevin R. C. "Thomas Jefferson 's Federalism, 1774-1825." Modern Age 53, no. 3, Summer 2012, 77. [5] Letster J. Cappon, Letster, The Adams-Jefferson letters : the Complete Correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams. (New York: Van Rees Press, 1959), 54. [14] Crossen, Cynthia. "We Worship Jefferson, But We Have Become Hamilton 's America." Wall Street Journal - Eastern Edition, February 04, 2004, [15] Paul S [18] Lewis, Meriwether. The Expedition of Lewis and Clark. (Philadelphia: Bradford and Inskeep, 1966), 12.

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