Job Satisfaction

Topics: Management, Employment, Leadership, Organizational studies and human resource management, Motivation, Psychology / Pages: 13 (3139 words) / Published: Nov 16th, 2010
Job Satisfaction

Abstract

Employee job satisfaction and retention happens to be an issue to be debated in terms of attaining an increased degree of productivity within the organization. Job satisfaction is best defined as a set of feelings and emotions employees associate with their work. Theoretically, an organization with employees that display actions of substantial absenteeism as well as turnover due to low levels of job satisfaction would generally suffer from greater recruitment and retraining cost that will hinder profitability. Unfortunately, the majority of businesses have failed to make job satisfaction a top management priority; this particular trend is attributed to the failure to recognize the significant advantages an organization would enjoy just by adjusting their mindset. Organizations that can produce multicultural work environments, which attract, motivate and keep hard-working people, are better positioned to succeed in today's competitive global markets.

Job Satisfaction

Working for most people is inevitable. Work is what people must do to pay the bills and make their dreams real. However, sometimes it appears as though work just takes too much energy and all workers wind up accomplishing is feeling tired, frustrated, unfulfilled and eventually burned out. Accomplishment and the sense of inner fulfillment and pride achieved when performing a specific job is not there. Job satisfaction occurs when an employee feels he has accomplished something having importance and value worthy of recognition and a feeling of joy. This definition suggests that workers form attitudes towards jobs by taking into account feelings, beliefs, and behaviors. Taken as a whole and adding cultural diversity in today's global business environments greatly affect job satisfaction which in turn affect business functions and profitability.

Job Satisfaction Factors

Age, occupational level, organizational size and commitment are a few of the



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