Jefferson Vs Hamilton Dbq

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Jefferson and Hamilton were both fundamental in the creation of the Constitution and the present government. They both agreed that the government needed some changes, but that is where the similarities ended. Hamilton was the creator of the Federalist Party which represented favor in strong central government, a Federal Bank, and a stable financial system. Jefferson was the creator of the Anti-Federalist Party who did not favor strong central government, and believed in an agrarian economy. Both leaders had influence on the new government and economy of America, but had different view on how it should be run.

Both leaders/groups contributed in the ratification of the Constitution, but interpreted the foundations and articles differently. For example, Jefferson believed that the proposed central government was unconstitutional because it was not written in the Constitution. In Doc. A, Jefferson stated "that all powers not delegated to the U.S. by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it by the states, remain with the people." Hamilton and the Federalists believed in loose interpretation of the Constitution, so that the central
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The disagreement between the two parties would bring about a great outcome that is still in use today, the Bill of Rights. The Federalist's were afraid above all, of disorder, anarchy, and chaos. This reason supported why they did not think that a Bill of Rights was needed. It would bring freedom and liberty to act differently, not to be the same. As in Doc. E and Doc. F the Federalists wanted, "every citizen to have the same option, the same passion, and the same interests." Also, that "any such person being therefore convicted... shall be punished by fine, and imprisoned." This was part of the Sedition Acts that the Federalists made partly to silence opposition from the

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