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Jean Piaget Theory Of Child Development

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Jean Piaget Theory Of Child Development
In Piaget theory on child development the three stages of development that we go through that starts from infancy are Sensorimotor, preoperational, and concrete operational. Gonzalez-Mena, Janet (2014) states that according to Jean Piaget theory children construct knowledge and develop their reasoning abilities through interactions with people and the environment as they seek to understand the world and how it works
(Gonzalez-Mena, Janet, 2014).
When it comes to development Piaget “believed” these stages develop as we mature while they occur in different “stages” that always fall in place, bringing children together in a warm environment and allowing them to interact in exploratory way (Gonzalez-Mena, Janet, 2014, p. 23). In the sensorimotor
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In this stage they understand that objects exist even if there not there. In the concrete operational stage kids think in solid terms they can comprehend their reality all the more “objectively and rationally” they can group and “conserve” (Gonzalez-Mena, Janet, 2014, p. 23).
When it comes to early childhood education Piaget theory has a major impact on children development because each stage helps a child to progress the children are not forced to learn but are encouraged to learn by engaging in age appropriate activities that also engage their senses infants and toddlers need stimulation they need to feel, touch, smell, see, and hear things in their environment.
As children grow so does their development and as with Piaget developmental theory I believe these stages are very critical when it comes to a child’s growth. Children in the preoperational stage need to be able to use their imagination engage in meaningful conversations. When children reach the concrete operational stage they need to be challenged in ways that encourage them to
…show more content…
We have to have the knowledge, aptitudes, and practices that are essential components in deciding how much children learn as well as how prepared for elementary school. Professional in the field of education are being solicited to have more profound understandings when it comes to child development and education issues. We are advocates for children and continue professional development that enhances a child’s learning and skills. Professionals are knowledgeable of code of ethics, standards and competencies.
I strongly believe that early childhood professionals dedicate their time not only to education but as their life work. They dedicate their life to promoting education through social, emotional, cognitive, and motor development they work on developing the whole child. They dedicate themselves doing the best they can do for each child. We build strong relations with families to ensure the best interest for the child. We work with other childhood professionals to gain insight on any new developments in the field, to interact and learn about other educators and how they

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