Japanese Internment Camps Unfair

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World War II was an unforgettable event that touched the lives of nearly every American. After the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, this action made Americans fear and despise them. There were rumors that they exchanged military information and had hidden connections. None of these claims were ever proven. The U.S. government became increasingly paranoid about this new problem and demanded action. Citizens and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry were forced by the federal government to abandon their homes and possessions on the west coast into internment camps. Taking innocent Japanese Americans away from their homes and livelihoods with no compensation is deplorable. They were sent to internment camps for the duration of the Pacific War. The big question that everyone wants an answer to is why the American government and people decided on this path to act. Japanese internment camps were unfair to the vast majority of the Japanese people who would not have engaged in sabotage or spying for japan during the war. The government’s enforcement of Executive Order 9066 during World War II was a result of racism and prejudice.

On Thursday, February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed an Executive Order 9066, which called for an evacuation of Japanese Americans to move them to one of the 10 internment camps. These internment camps were officially
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The first requirement is to check the evacuee's behavior at the relocation center and other information from the WRA. If there is any evidence that the evacuee would endanger the nation he or she was denied leave. The second requirement was that officials or citizens must have a reasonable reason where the evacuee planned to settle. Only those who had a place to go or any means of support was granted leave. The last requirement was that evacuees must keep WRA informed of any change of job or

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