On February 19th 1942, Roosevelt signed the executive order 9066. Under the terms of the order, people of Japanese descent were placed in internment camps. The United States’ justification for this abominable action was that the Japanese American’s may spy for their Homeland. Over 62% of the Japanese that were held in these camps were American Citizens. The United States’ internment of the Japanese was a poor and cowardly method of ‘keeping the peace.’ The United States was not justified in stowing away Japanese Americans into almost concentration camps. This act goes against the basic Bill Of Rights granted to all American citizens, the Fifth Amendment's command that no person shall be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law, And how under Article 1, section 9 of the constitution ‘the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion, the public safety may require it.’ The United States revokes the basic rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness from the Japanese. The United States also destroys the basic concept of the bill of rights through these internment camps.
The constitution of the united states of America states that “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” (Bill Of Rights, Constitution) However, in the internment camps that held these Japanese Americans, the majority of who were children or American citizens, were ordered to leave their homes and continue to a secluded area of the state where they would not be reachable by outsiders. They were seized from their homes against their will which is a direct violation of the Constitution. This is immoral and technically congress has gone

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