Japanese Etiqutte in Workplace or Business

Topics: Japan, Decision making, Nonverbal communication Pages: 13 (5086 words) Published: July 8, 2013
Japan, a country within the continent of Asia, is a chain of island located east of Korea with a population exceeding 125 million. Japan does business in a wide range of industries and the Japanese are open to receiving imported products. The Japanese dominate the industry of electrical and electronics equipment and they are also top leaders in the production of vehicle, machinery, and chemicals. Why is Japan so successful in their business endeavors? According to the research, the answer to this question lies within the heart of the Japanese culture.

The Japanese welcome business people from abroad and take pride in delivering high quality products. The Japanese strive off being highly motivated, resourceful, and very industrious. Respect, honor, courtesy and patient are virtues held dear.

Japanese having had a very unique culture and also good at mixing other cultures with theirs. As a result of this blending, they come out their own identity. For this, China was the most importantly influenced. “Buddhist and Confucian” philosophy is the basic framework that Japanese use to develop they way of thinking. Buddhist was contributing the way of life. The Confusion taught the Japanese about traditional value, external values and harmony within the society, whilst at the same time emphasizing the collective aspect of the social order. In the company analysis, the terms flat and tall are use to describe the levels of spans of control on a hierarchy of management. Hierarchy is extremely important in Japanese corporate culture. Relative status in organization determines how members interact with each other and how they expect others to interact with them.. The tall structure includes a hierarchy of many levels and with very small or narrow spans of control. It produces very close supervision and very careful control. Power is held at the top and is shared among a limited number of individual. Individuals on top are depended on the skill, initiative and daring and individuals at the bottom have very little say in decision making. Hanna and Wilson, 1988 have noted that classical bureaucratic structure is typically very tall. The hierarchy of a flat structure has fewer levels than that of a tall structure and its power field is much broader. Amongst discerning factors that separate what is flat and tall is the amount of communication that passes through an organization. Hanna and Wilson established that in a tall structure, downward communication flows from the top towards the bottom in an expansion fashion, but upward communication from the bottom to the top is restricted. The greater the number of the levels in the hierarchy, the greater the tendency for upward and downward communication flow to be distorted. A flat structure tends to be rather loose in terms of control and supervision – more individuals to a single supervisor and each individual has more independence in decision-making. The communication problems that derive from a flat structure have to do primarily with information overloaded. Since the individual supervisor’s span of control in much greater, he or she has to process many more messages from subordinates than a manager who has a far more limited span of control in a tall structure. And also, with the consequent increase in information, it tends to decrease task efficiency because it decreases role specialization. With such open communication due to consensual nature of Japanese society, it is evident that the company management structure is far flatten when compared to local or foreign and Japanese managers demand far more responsible participation of all the workers. But rigid hierarchies stifle communication between different ranks and discourage workers from questioning their bosses’ decision. The result is that employees have felt unable to blow the whistle (at least openly) on unsavoury practice. The collective aspect of the social order about traditional value, external values and harmony within the...
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