Japanese Americans In 'Without Due Process'

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We live in a country in which the military authorities are continuing to claim and put into effect the same type of supreme power those countries such as China and Burma exhibit. In short, the Fifth Amendment states that no United States citizen should be “deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law” (findlaw.com). In Without Due Process, Japanese Americans share their stories about their experience of incarceration, day-to-day life in the camps, feelings about the internment, as well as what it means to be Japanese American in this country. The reaction by government officials in this time period had strained Japanese Americans way of life. It also forced society to become discriminatory and racially biased against their fellow Americans. …show more content…
Even today, in the year 2006, the American government along with its people is culturally prejudiced. The most recent display of these injustices has occurred since September 11, 2000. After an attack on American soil by al-Qaeda, Arab Americans have been racially profiled intensely. Quoted in the New York Times, Azhar Usman (a burly American-born Muslim with a heavy black beard) states “he elicits an almost universal reaction when he boards an airplane at any United States airport: conversations stop in mid-sentence and the look in the eyes of his fellow passengers says, ‘We're all going to die!’” (Macfarquhar, NY Times 2006). Similar to Japanese Americans, Arab Americans can be easily identified therefore making it easier to

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