Jane Eyre

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Jane Eyre Essay “The humblest individual exerts some influence, either for good or evil, upon others” said Henry Ward Beecher. Everyone has some type of influence on another, whether it is big or small, good or bad. For example, outside influences, such as other characters, can affect a characters actions and thoughts in either a positive or negative way. In the novel Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte, many characters influenced Jane, but Mr. Rochester and St. John Rivers had the most influence on her personality. Although the two men were very different from one another, they both had an impact on Jane’s transformation into a strong and independent women thought their actions, love, and influence. Mr. Rochester differs greatly with St. John though their outlook on religious and moral beliefs. “I advise you to live sinless; and I wish you to die tranquil.” (p.398) Mr. Rochester is portrayed as a sinner because he did not inform Jane that he was still married to Bertha Mason. His desire to keep Jane at Thornfield as his mistress displayed his lack of morality. While Mr. Rochester is passionate and desperate, St. John is cold and determined. St. John’s somber personality is made clear when he said, “I want a wife: the sole helpmeet I can influence efficiently in life and retain absolutely till death. (p.506) St. John, unlike Mr. Rochester, followed religious principles and moral values. These two men are both the most influential males in her life, but they are both so different from one another. Although Mr. Rochester and St. John had very different beliefs, they both brought out changes in Jane’s character. If Jane were to accept Rochester’s first proposal, she would had sacrificed her dignity for love. “I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself.” (p.398) Jane does not accept his proposal in marriage in order to preserve her self-esteem. This struggle with Rochester

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