Jackie Robinson's Role In Major League Baseball

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Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. Racism should be stopped in every state it should no matter if you are an African-American or a Regular American there are a lot of great African-Americans that did very helpful things in the United States. Jackie Robinson was the first African-American that played in Major League Baseball sure there were the Negro leagues where only African-Americans could play. Jackie Robinson played in the Negro leagues for his first couple of years. Then came the Major Leagues team the Brooklyn Dodgers they were a average team in the league. There manager is the only reason Jackie played in the Major Leagues Branch Rickey wanted a new player in the League. So he decided to call up the manager …show more content…
Even some of his teammates were starting to sign a piece of paper that had all of the names who didn't want to play with Jackie Robinson. Then there was the teammates that didn't care if he was an African-American and had a different skin color then the rest of the Major League players. Some of those certain people were Branch Rickey,the Brooklyn Dodgers coach, and Pee Wee Reese there were some more of his teammates to. Jackie Robinson and a lot of other people wanted racism to stop in every state he and everyone else wanted it to was called bad thing in a lot of areas. It also changes life for every African-American they aren't able to go in the same bathroom they aren't allowed to sit anywhere they want on a bus only in the back. Then there are the pitchers of other teams they almost always threw extra hard or hit Jackie Robinson in the head. Jackie was chosen out of all of the Negro Ball players because Jackie could run really fast and could hit a Home Run every chance he got. Those weren't the only reasons that Branch Rickey chose him because he knew at the start that Jackie Robinson was strong enough and had courage to not fight back to all of the threats and names he was called. Jackie was told from Branch Rickey that “he wanted someone who had the courage not to fight

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