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Globa City Even though there is no universally agreed definition of a city, it has been generally accepted to be a comparatively great and permanent settlement for many people (Kenoyer, 1998). In the initial days it was a land largely dominated by natural features. The face of humanity was full of ample supply of resources. The population grew. Man started to scrabble for resources. Huge and beautiful architectural feature were erected. Roads tacked and electricity spread throughout the corners of the streets. People stopped working between the day hours. The nights stopped being the being the resting moments. People became more aggressive and the means of acquiring daily bread became crude and inhumane. Streets are filled with the young women posing for willing buyer and young men busy mugging hard working member of the society.
Indeed the city of Globa is born. The rate of crime increasing and social interaction intensified. Some call it the effect of development; others call it the innovative nature of humanity. To some the curse of a city has brought with it cannot be exhausted. It is full of prostitution, insecurity, air and noise pollution. However, all people can say is that the society has moved on and the problems of a city have been embraced as the joy of globalization.
The foregoing description of the city is meant to put forth the theme industrialization and environmental concerns. It seeks to argue that even though cities are seen to be the modern part of humanity, little is done to help the society understand that a lot has been sacrificed in order to give that name. the city that comes with danger is the city that is embraced in the 21st century.
Reference
Kenoyer, Jonathan Mark (1998) Ancient Cities of the Indus Valley Civilization. Oxford University Press, Karachi and New York.

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