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Island Lake Essay

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Island Lake Essay
We are a community of 26 private dwellings, with 62 individuals living in these residences. We are an isolated community, accessible only by air and or ice roads in the winter, we are 297 kilometres from Thompson, Manitoba and 300 kilometers north of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Our community is serviced by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and we have a huge problem and the RCMP have stepped up in a huge way. Yes, we are a First Nations community, by the name of, Island lake. Island Lake, Manitoba is a northern reservation that has had many problems in the past and continue to do so today, and will in the future as well if the problems aren’t addressed soon. One major concern for the local RCMP detachment, located at 406 Main St, Stevenson Island, Manitoba R0B 2H0 was the harsh climate that was on average -45 degrees Celsius. This was a major concern because most of the community was without proper clothing for the winter, so the station decided to do something that would bring the community and the …show more content…
He knew this was going to be a long shot since the Reserve was so isolated and northern that had harsh climates, but he was willing along with the RCMP to give this their all and mighty effort. With the word spreading around the surrounding communities such as, Gardenhill, St. Theresa Point and Wassagamack, the clothing drive began to spread its wings and develop at a fast rate. Merasty had no idea that the drive would be so big and popular, the word was being spread like wild fire. Within no time, multiple agencies wanted to get their hands involved with this project including, Morden, Manitoba Police Service, Morden Unidet-way, Morden Fire Department and local trucking agencies proving trucks to transport the clothes to the community and a local airport donating a cargo plane to provide people to volunteer and transport boxes of

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