Is The Relationship Between Huck And Jim's Relationship In Huckleberry Finn

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The societies rules of relationships between whites and blacks in Huckleberry Finn are ignored by Huck and Jim's friendship. The rules set up by the society in this time was that, white people are superior to blacks, and blacks are not superior to whites, especially not slaves. Yet, Huck and Jim don't follow these rules. Normally a black man would know when to not argue with someone white, but Huck and Jim had a friendly banter about the French language. "'…Is a Frenchman a man?' ‘Yes.' ‘Well, den! Dad blame it, why doan' he talk like a man?...'" (75). In this banter, Jim couldn't understand why the Frenchman talked differently than him. Huck would respond to try to explain why there are different languages. The argument they were having is like two friends have a small banter between each other and having no one really be correct just because they are "superior". Huck has a strong friendship with Jim, one that defies all the rules of society. …show more content…
In society protecting a runaway slave is against the rules. Huck has done this multiple times before, lying to others to protect Jim from being taken back and sold off again. The bond of loyalty that the two have, is strong, stronger than a white-black loyalty. Huck's even lied to two slave hunters before, "'Well, there's five niggers run off to-night, up yonder above the head of the bend. Is your man white or black?' …I see I was weakening; so I just give up trying, and up and says- ‘He's white.'" (83). When Huck lied to the two slave hunters if he was caught lying, he could've been in trouble with the law, and Jim would've obviously been in trouble with the law for being a runaway slave. What Huck did to not turn in his friend and get him sent back to being a slave is courageous and takes a bond between the people. Friendship is about protecting each other and having

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