Is Our School System Doing Enough Analysis

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Is Your School System Doing Enough?
In “What Our Education System Needs Is More F’s” the author, Carl Singleton, states that even though most high paying jobs require higher education we [America] need to get back to the basics. Which is giving out letter grades that are rightfully earned. Although, "sending students home with final grades of F would force most parents to deal with the realities of their children's failure..." think about all the negative effects giving an F might have. Such as it may lower self-esteem, as well as self-worth, and increase grade retention.
During this essay the authors tone was very direct and persuasive toward anyone whom was reading the article. All in all, you could conclude that the author, Carl Singleton thinks very poorly teachers and the schooling system in general. Within in the composition the author claims that “Illiteracy among high-school graduates is growing because those students have been passed rather than flunked; we have low- quality teachers who never should have been certified in the first place…” in other words he [the author] believes low quality teaching leads to unfair grading. I believe that teachers probably realize that when kids always get F’s after putting in a lot of effort it lowers their self-esteem and will make them want to give up. Instead of keep trying. I know for a fact that if I kept getting F’s on papers that I worked my heart out on all the time I would eventually quit because I would feel stupid and feel
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Singleton brings up is that “Giving an F whenever and wherever it is the only appropriate grade would force principles, school boards, and voters to come to terms with cost as a factor in improving our educational system.” Although, I’m not exactly sure how that would correlate because usually public schools get paid based on the number of days individuals show up which is why students usually get in trouble when they miss a certain amount of days not based off

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