Is Inequality Necessary?

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According to Adam Ferguson and John Miller, inequality is necessary because it is a great thing. These two believe that with inequality, private property will emerge and when it does people will be creating assets for themselves. When the people are able to create assets, they have a motive to work harder to earn what they deserve. Being more efficient on a daily basis can help a person become more active and helps them accomplishes more. A person can save the resources that they have and convert it into assets of their own, thus creating their own wealth. Ferguson and Millar says that because of personal incentives, a person will not stop working after they have completed their job and received the needed amount. Instead, they will continue on to work even more to gain more in order move up the ladder in society. As social progress, it aids in the development of civilization which is the ultimate goal. I believe that inequality is necessary, because of how unfair things are, if a person is willing to work harder than another, they should have more assets for themselves.

Adam Ferguson and John Miller see inequality as something that is necessary for the development of civilization. One must work hard to achieve goals and build up more assets for themselves. Free-rider program on the other hand is similar to a free-lancer. A person, who refuses to participate in the work need to push forward, is in a way opposite to what Ferguson and Miller said about inequality. There are lazy people out there who would rather have someone else do the work for them. A group working on a project can only hope that the other members on their team will be able to do their own part. With inequality in the air, a person can only predict that the free rider program will follow. A person’s asset will only grow as big as they are pushing it to be, but without hard work and by doing mediocre job, an individual might not get too far. Mankind is always moving forward and the free

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