Is Industrialisation Leading to the Depletion of Drinking Water Resources

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Is Industrialisation leading to the depletion of drinking water resources?

Water...Water...everywhere, but not a drop to drink??? How So? While seventy one percent of our planet is covered by water, it would seem that we could never run out of water. But did you know that of that seventy one percent water, ninety seven percent is salt water. Only the other three percent is fresh water, which is in the form of: oceans, glaciers, polar caps, lakes, rivers, and ground water. And out of this three percent, only one percent is available for use to nourish agriculture, humans, and animals and to run our factories.

This leads me into the question I pose for the future. Will there be enough drinking water to support mankind in the year 2025? And if the answer is no, is Industrialisation the principal cause for this? I would like to take a look at the factors that cause water crisis and in doing so I would like to prove beyond any doubt that there are more significant reasons than industrialisation, causing fresh water depletion.

Throughout mankind’s four and a half million years on this planet, the world's fresh water reserves were more than adequate to serve human needs while maintaining the integrity and biological diversity of the earth's ecosystems. As the population of this planet has grown, we have increasingly tapped deeper into our planet’s fresh water resources, when and where it is needed. Our available fresh water is static, there is essentially no more fresh water on the planet today than there was 2,000 years ago when the earth's human population was less than three percent its current size. The trend of population growth is quite obvious. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, International Data Base, the population of the world in 1955 was 2.8 billion; in the year 1990, the world’s population increased to 5.3

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